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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » ESQRU » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #362934

Research Project: Evaluation of Management of Laying Hens and Housing Systems to Control Salmonella and Other Pathogenic Infections, Egg Contamination, and Product Quality

Location: ESQRU

Title: Assessment of Current Egg Density Methods

Author
item OXFORD, LAURA - University Of Georgia
item ARANIBAR, CARLA - University Of Georgia
item Jones, Deana
item WILSON, JEANNA - University Of Georgia

Submitted to: Poultry Science Association Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/30/2019
Publication Date: 7/15/2019
Citation: Oxford, L., Aranibar, C., Jones, D.R., Wilson, J. 2019. Assessment of Current Egg Density Methods. Poultry Science Association Meeting Abstract. 98(1):162.

Interpretive Summary: Specific gravity has been used in the poultry industry as a measure of egg shell quality and density for many years. It is performed by sinking intact eggs into water with varying levels of salinity. Eggs that float at each known salinity are removed and recorded. This method is widely accepted, however, it is subject to human error and inaccurate observations. A novel method of determining egg shell density measurements is the use of a VolScan Profiler. The device was developed to aid in determining the volume of bakery products and has been proven effective in determining various measurements of eggs. The VolScan is advantageous over conventional specific gravity measures because the egg is not destroyed, there is no risk of human error, and the device is very accurate. The objective of this observational study was to determine the accuracy of conventional specific gravity measures compared to the VolScan predicted specific gravity derived from density. For this study, eggs from the same breeder flock were taken weekly from 28 to 40 weeks of age. A minimum of 443 eggs were sampled weekly using conventional specific gravity methods and a minimum of 290 additional eggs were tested weekly using the VolScan. There was an average difference between the VolScan and conventional specific gravity measures of 0.0078 over the 12 weeks. Statistical analysis was performed using JMP Pro 14 statistical software. One-way ANOVA analysis results showed that the VolScan measure of specific gravity was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) than conventional specific gravity methods.

Technical Abstract: Specific gravity has been used in the poultry industry as a measure of egg shell quality and density for many years. It is performed by sinking intact eggs into water with varying levels of salinity. Eggs that float at each known salinity are removed and recorded. This method is widely accepted, however, it is subject to human error and inaccurate observations. A novel method of determining egg shell density measurements is the use of a VolScan Profiler. The device was developed to aid in determining the volume of bakery products and has been proven effective in determining various measurements of eggs. The VolScan is advantageous over conventional specific gravity measures because the egg is not destroyed, there is no risk of human error, and the device is very accurate. The objective of this observational study was to determine the accuracy of conventional specific gravity measures compared to the VolScan predicted specific gravity derived from density. For this study, eggs from the same breeder flock were taken weekly from 28 to 40 weeks of age. A minimum of 443 eggs were sampled weekly using conventional specific gravity methods and a minimum of 290 additional eggs were tested weekly using the VolScan. There was an average difference between the VolScan and conventional specific gravity measures of 0.0078 over the 12 weeks. Statistical analysis was performed using JMP Pro 14 statistical software. One-way ANOVA analysis results showed that the VolScan measure of specific gravity was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) than conventional specific gravity methods.