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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » ESQRU » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #362911

Research Project: Evaluation of Management of Laying Hens and Housing Systems to Control Salmonella and Other Pathogenic Infections, Egg Contamination, and Product Quality

Location: ESQRU

Title: What are the needs of the U.S. table egg industry?

Author
item KARCHER, DARRIN - Purdue University
item MUHAMMED, ALVA - Purdue University
item Jones, Deana
item GARRISON, OSCAR - United Egg Producers
item VOLD, LESA - Egg Industry Center

Submitted to: Poultry Science Association Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/30/2019
Publication Date: 7/15/2019
Citation: Karcher, D.M., Muhammed, A., Jones, D.R., Garrison, O., Vold, L. 2019. What are the needs of the U.S. table egg industry?. Poultry Science Association Meeting Abstract. 98(1):125.

Interpretive Summary: Land-grant universities must continue to meet the needs of the table egg industry even as companies are faced with new and unique challenges in today’s business environment. Providing Extension and outreach programming, undergraduate education and research are all needed to help the industry overcome these challenges. To these ends, a needs assessment survey was created with input from stakeholder groups including the United Egg Producers, United Egg Association and the Egg Industry Center. The survey consisted of 30 questions across extension, teaching and research. The instrument was disseminated via email from the stakeholder groups as well as state poultry associations and individuals, mostly allied industry, who sent it to their customers. The survey was open November and December 2018. There were 447 responses with 192 completing the entire survey. The respondents’ jobs were classified as: 53% production, 17% processing, 17% feed mill, 7% breeders/hatchery and 6% allied industry/other and most respondents (92%) were associated with complexes housing more than 50,000 hens. The top 3 egg producing states were best represented: 14% IA, 13% OH, 13% IN. When asked where the company seeks information/education/training, responses were 30% university, 24% consultants and 23% commodity associations. Local and state extension services are used by the table egg industry 51 – 68% of the time. Need for additional employee training across different areas was assessed by ranking on a 1-10 scale (none to extremely beneficial). The mean scores for different areas were animal welfare (7.72), management (7.72), biosecurity regulations (8.23), manager training (7.57), food safety (7.49) and product quality (7.42). When asked about using research information to drive day-to-day decisions, 63% indicated they use it monthly or more frequently while 29% use it a few times a year. Participants were asked open-ended questions throughout the survey to understand more specific programming or research needs. Example responses included: “Smaller companies are the ones most in need of training and most will not likely send their non-supervisory employees far off for training. Training that can be developed, shared and implemented locally may be more utilized and effective.”, “Cage free production assistance” and “More on site education and guidance”. Overall, the needs assessment indicates there are numerous programmatic areas that should be addressed over the next 3-5 years. The impact could be magnified if we rethink collaborations amongst extension personnel, commodity associations and private consultants.

Technical Abstract: Land-grant universities must continue to meet the needs of the table egg industry even as companies are faced with new and unique challenges in today’s business environment. Providing Extension and outreach programming, undergraduate education and research are all needed to help the industry overcome these challenges. To these ends, a needs assessment survey was created with input from stakeholder groups including the United Egg Producers, United Egg Association and the Egg Industry Center. The survey consisted of 30 questions across extension, teaching and research. The instrument was disseminated via email from the stakeholder groups as well as state poultry associations and individuals, mostly allied industry, who sent it to their customers. The survey was open November and December 2018. There were 447 responses with 192 completing the entire survey. The respondents’ jobs were classified as: 53% production, 17% processing, 17% feed mill, 7% breeders/hatchery and 6% allied industry/other and most respondents (92%) were associated with complexes housing more than 50,000 hens. The top 3 egg producing states were best represented: 14% IA, 13% OH, 13% IN. When asked where the company seeks information/education/training, responses were 30% university, 24% consultants and 23% commodity associations. Local and state extension services are used by the table egg industry 51 – 68% of the time. Need for additional employee training across different areas was assessed by ranking on a 1-10 scale (none to extremely beneficial). The mean scores for different areas were animal welfare (7.72), management (7.72), biosecurity regulations (8.23), manager training (7.57), food safety (7.49) and product quality (7.42). When asked about using research information to drive day-to-day decisions, 63% indicated they use it monthly or more frequently while 29% use it a few times a year. Participants were asked open-ended questions throughout the survey to understand more specific programming or research needs. Example responses included: “Smaller companies are the ones most in need of training and most will not likely send their non-supervisory employees far off for training. Training that can be developed, shared and implemented locally may be more utilized and effective.”, “Cage free production assistance” and “More on site education and guidance”. Overall, the needs assessment indicates there are numerous programmatic areas that should be addressed over the next 3-5 years. The impact could be magnified if we rethink collaborations amongst extension personnel, commodity associations and private consultants.