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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » Horticultural Crops Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #361435

Research Project: Integrated Disease Management of Exotic and Emerging Plant Diseases of Horticultural Crops

Location: Horticultural Crops Research

Title: Incubation of Phytophthora ramorum-infested leaf debris in soil affects survival, sporulation capacity, and subsequent risk of epidemic development within nurseries

Author
item Peterson, Ebba - Oregon State University
item Grunwald, Niklaus - Nik
item Parke, Jennifer - Oregon State University

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/15/2016
Publication Date: 3/1/2017
Citation: Peterson, E.K., Grunwald, N.J., Parke, J.L. 2017. Incubation of Phytophthora ramorum-infested leaf debris in soil affects survival, sporulation capacity, and subsequent risk of epidemic development within nurseries. In: Proceedings of the Sudden Oak Death Sixth Science Symposium; 6/20/16-6/23/16; San Francisco, CA. Available: https://www.fs.fed.us/psw/publications/documents/psw_gtr255/psw_gtr255.pdf. 48 p.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Soilborne inoculum (infested leaf debris which has become incorporated into the soil) may be an important contributor to the persistence of the sudden oak death pathogen Phytophthora ramorum in recurrently positive nurseries. To initiate new epidemics, soilborne inoculum must not only be able to survive over time, but also be capable of producing sporangia during times favorable to infection of plant material at the soil surface. Current research has only assessed the recovery of this pathogen after being buried in soils. Two additional aspects of the disease cycle are being investigated in a field trial at the National Ornamentals Research Site at Dominican University of California (NORS-DUC): the infection of leaf baits at the soil surface and the capacity to produce sporangia post-incubation.