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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #360917

Research Project: Sarcopenia, Nutrition, and Physical Activity

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: Self-reported physical function as a predictor of hospitalization in the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Study

Author
item Callahan, Kathryn - Wake Forest University
item Lovato, Laura - Wake Forest University
item Miller, Michael - Wake Forest University
item Marsh, Anthony - Wake Forest University
item Fielding, Roger - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Gill, Thomas - Yale University
item Groessl, Erik - University Of California
item Guralnik, Jack - University Of Maryland
item King, Abby - Stanford University
item Kritchevsky, Stephen - Wake Forest University
item Mcdermott, Mary - Northwestern University
item Manini, Todd - University Of Florida
item Newman, Anne - University Of Pittsburgh
item Rejeski, W. Jack - Wake Forest University

Submitted to: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/15/2018
Publication Date: 10/3/2018
Citation: Callahan, K.E., Lovato, L., Miller, M.E., Marsh, A.P., Fielding, R.A., Gill, T.M., Groessl, E.J., Guralnik, J., King, A.C., Kritchevsky, S.B., McDermott, M.M., Manini, T.M., Newman, A.B., Rejeski, W. 2018. Self-reported physical function as a predictor of hospitalization in the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Study. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 66(10):1927-1933. https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.15468.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.15468

Interpretive Summary: This study examined whether baseline scores on the Mobility Assessment Tool-short form (MAT-sf), a brief, animated, computer-based tool developed to assess mobility, was associated with number of hospitalizations and time to first hospitalization over a three year follow up period. We used data from the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Study, a randomized clinical trial of lifestyle interventions to preserve mobility in older adults. Of the 1,557 participants completing MAT-sf and data regarding hospitalization status, 726 (47%) had at least 1 hospitalization, and 78% of these had 1 or 2 hospitalizations. For every 10-point lower MAT-sf score, the rate of all hospitalizations was 19% higher in those with lower scores. Lower MAT-sf scores were also associated with greater risk of first hospitalization. Low MAT-sf scores identify older adults at risk of hospitalization; further study is needed to test interventions to reduce hospitalizations in these individuals.

Technical Abstract: Objectives: To explore whether baseline scores on the Mobility Assessment Tool-short form (MAT-sf), a brief, animated, computer-based means of assessing mobility that predicts mobility disability, are associated with number of hospitalizations and time to first hospitalization over a median follow-up of 2.7 years. Design: Post hoc analysis of prospectively gathered data from the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Study, a randomized clinical trial of lifestyle interventions to preserve mobility in older adults. Setting: Eight U.S. academic medical centers. Participants: Of 1,635 sedentary community-dwelling older adults enrolled in LIFE, 1,574 completed baseline physical function screening including the MAT-sf, with baseline scores ranging from 30.2 (low function) to 69.8 (high function) on a scale from 30 to 80. Measurements: Number of hospitalizations and time to first hospitalization, adjusted for age, sex, race, living alone, clinical site, baseline comorbidities, number of prescription medications, and cognition. Results: Of the 1,557 participants with data regarding hospitalization status, 726 (47%) had at least 1 hospitalization; 78% of these had 1 or 2 hospitalizations. For every 10-point lower MAT-sf score, the rate of all hospitalizations was 19% higher in those with lower scores (adjusted rate ratio=1.20, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.08-1.32, p<.001). Lower baseline MAT-sf scores were also associated with greater risk of first hospitalization (adjusted hazard ratio=1.20, 95% CI=1.09-1.32, p<.01, per 10-point lower MAT-sf score). Conclusion: Low MAT-sf scores identify older adults at risk of hospitalization; further study is needed to test interventions to reduce hospitalizations in these individuals.