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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #360723

Research Project: Cardiovascular Nutrition and Health

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: Habituation to diets enriched in palmitate and stearate relative to oleate differentially affect CVD risk factors and markers of inflammation in post-menopausal women

Author
item Matthan, Nirupa - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Meng, Huicui - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Wu, Dayong - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Li, Lijun - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Lichtenstein, Alice - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/14/2018
Publication Date: 6/11/2018
Citation: Matthan, N.R., Meng, H., Wu, D., Li, L., Lichtenstein, A.H. 2018. Habituation to diets enriched in palmitate and stearate relative to oleate differentially affect CVD risk factors and markers of inflammation in post-menopausal women [abstract]. American Society of Nutrition. Abstract #OR17-05.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Objective: Dietary fat quality has a significant impact on CVD risk, yet the relative effects of stearate (18:0), a longer chain SFA relative to palmitate (16:0), a shorter chain SFA and to its metabolic product, oleate (18:1), a MUFA, remain unclear. We investigated the effect of consuming diets enriched in either 16:0, 18:0 or 18:1 on CVD risk factors, indicators of systemic inflammation and innate immunity. Methods: Twenty mildly hypercholesterolemic (LDL-C>100mg/dL) post-menopausal women (50-85 years; BMI 25-35kg/m^2) consumed each of 3 diets for 35 days according to a randomized controlled cross-over design. Diets provided 55%E carbohydrate, 15%E protein and 30%E fat with half of the fat provided by 16:0, 18:0 or 18:1, respectively. Plasma FA composition was determined by gas chromatography and CVD risk factors by standard methodology. Lymphocyte proliferation was measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation following stimulation with anti-CD3/CD28 and T-cell mitogen Con A using a whole-blood assay. PGE2 and cytokine production in the presence/absence of LPS was measured using a radioimmunoassay. Results: Plasma FA profiles reflected, to a limited extent, the FA enriched in the diet. Plasma levels of 18:1 were similar after participants consumed the 18:0 and 18:1 enriched diet, and higher than after participants consumed the 16:0 enriched diet. Fasting and non-fasting TC and LDL-C levels were significantly lower (~10%, p<0.05) after participants consumed the 18:0 and 18:1 enriched diets relative to the 16:0 enriched diet. HDL-C levels were significantly higher after consumption of the 16:0 enriched diet, relative to the 18:0 and 18:1 enriched diets, resulting in TC/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C ratios that were lowest after the 18:1 diet. There was little effect of the diets on plasma glucose or insulin levels, markers of coagulation, or systemic inflammation. However, the diet enriched in 16:0 resulted in a significantly higher T-cell proliferation in response to antibodies against CD3 (T cell receptor) and CD28 (T cell co-receptor), than diets enriched in 18:0 and 18:1. Conclusion: These data suggest that consumption of a diet enriched in 18:0 had a more favorable effect on CVD risk indicators and markers of innate immunity than a diet enriched in 16:0 and a similar effect to a diet enriched in 18:1.