Skip to main content
ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Adaptive Cropping Systems Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #359040

Research Project: Adaptation of Crops to Increased Carbon Dioxide and Warming

Location: Adaptive Cropping Systems Laboratory

Title: Temperature and CO2 effects on absorption, translocation and efficacy of cyhalofop-butyl on Echinochloa colona

Author
item REFATTI, JOAO PAULO - Federal University Of Pelotas
item DE AVILA, LUIS - Federal University Of Pelotas
item CAMARGO, EDINALVO - Federal University Of Pelotas
item Ziska, Lewis
item OLIVEIRA, CLAUDIA - Federal University Of Pelotas
item SALAS-PEREZ, REIOFELI - University Of Arkansas
item ROMA-BURGOS, NILDA - University Of Arkansas

Submitted to: Agronomy
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/23/2019
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: At present, overuse of selected herbicides has resulted in increased weed resistance to those chemicals for several weed species. It is unclear however, how environmental change, including rising temperatures and increasing carbon dioxide concentration [CO2], can alter weed growth and physiology and the degree of resistance to these chemicals. E. colona, or junglerice, is a troublesome weed in rice production worldwide. The objectives of the current study were to determine if increased atmospheric [CO2] and temperature affected the absorption, translocation and efficacy of cyhalofop-butyl (“Clincher”, Dow Chemical) on multiple-resistant (MR) and susceptible (S) junglerice ecotypes. Although plants grown under elevated [CO2] and high temperature were taller than those in ambient conditions; [CO2] and temperature did not affect herbicide effectiveness on susceptible (S) ecotypes. However, [CO2] and temperature did reduce injury induced by the herbicide on MR ecotypes, lowering its effectiveness. Overall, elevated [CO2] and high temperature did not affect the absorption and translocation of cyhalofop-butyl per se, but did increase the resistance level of multiple-resistant Echinochloa colona. Additional information is needed to reduce the mechanism; however, these data suggest that [CO2] and temperature could favor the MR ecotypes of junglerice over time. These data will be of interest to growers, chemical companies, scientists, ecologists and agronomists.

Technical Abstract: Environmental change, including rising temperatures and increasing carbon dioxide concentration [CO2], can alter weed growth and physiology. These changes could, potentially, alter herbicide efficacy and chemical weed management. The basis for any potential change in herbicide efficacy is not well understood. The objectives of the current studies were to quantify the effects of increased atmospheric [CO2] and temperature on absorption, translocation and efficacy of cyhalofop-butyl on multiple-resistant (MR) and susceptible Echinochloa colona ecotypes. E. colona, or junglerice, is a troublesome weed in rice production worldwide. Maximum 14C-cyhalofop-butyl absorption occurred at 72 h after herbicide treatment with >98% of cyhalofop-butyl retained in the treated leaf. Neither temperature nor [CO2] affected herbicide absorption or translocation within the plants. Although plants grown under elevated [CO2] and high temperature were taller than those in ambient conditions; [CO2] and temperature did not affect herbicide activity on susceptible ecotypes. However, visible injury was reduced on MR plants grown under elevated [CO2] and high temperature when compared to MR plants at ambient conditions. Overall, elevated [CO2] and high temperature did not affect the absorption and translocation of cyhalofop-butyl per se, but did increase the resistance level of multiple-resistant Echinochloa colona.