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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #358921

Research Project: Cardiovascular Nutrition and Health

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: Serum metabolomic profile of the dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH) diet

Author
item Rebholz, Casey - Johns Hopkins University
item Lichtenstein, Alice - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Appel, Lawrence - Johns Hopkins University
item Coresh, Josef - Johns Hopkins University

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/1/2018
Publication Date: 6/29/2018
Citation: Rebholz, C.M., Lichtenstein, A.H., Appel, L.J., Coresh, J. 2018. Serum metabolomic profile of the dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH) diet [abstract]. American Heart Association Epidemiology/Lifestyle Scientific Sessions. Abstract No. 056.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Introduction: The DASH dietary pattern emphasizes vegetable, fruits and low-fat dairy products and is associated with improved cardiometablic risk factors. No biomarkers exist for assessing adherence to this dietary pattern. The objective of the study was to use metabolomics to identify serum compounds that are associated with the DASH diet. Methods: We conducted untargeted metabolomic profiling in stored serum specimens collected from participants at the end of an 8-week multi-center, randomized, controlled feeding study (N=218) comparing the DASH diet to a diet typical of intake in the United States (control). Multivariable linear regression analysis was used to compare the association of individual log-transformed metabolites between the two diet phases, after adjusting for age, sex, race, education, body mass index, and hypertension. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis was used to identify a composite of compounds that discriminate between the DASH and control dietary patterns. Results: Serum levels of 97 known metabolites were significantly different among participants randomized to the DASH diet compared to the control diet at the Bonferroni threshold (p<6.11x10^-5; Figure). The majority of these 97 significant metabolites were lipids (n=64; 66.0%), followed by amino acids (n=15), xenobiotics which includes food components (n=10), cofactors and vitamins (n=6), carbohydrate (n=1), and nucleotide (n=1). The ten most influential metabolites for discriminating between the DASH and control diets were: N-methylproline, stachydrine, tryptophan betaine, theobromine, 7-methylurate, chiro-inositol, 3-methylxanthine, methyl glucopyranoside, B-cryptoxanthin, and 7-methylxanthine. Conclusion: An untargeted metabolomic platform identified a broad array of serum metabolites that differed between the DASH and control dietary patterns. Further research is necessary to validate this composite of ten metabolites as biomarkers of adherence to the DASH diet.