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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Davis, California » Crops Pathology and Genetics Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #358509

Research Project: Sustainable Vineyard Production Systems

Location: Crops Pathology and Genetics Research

Title: Managing Effects of Drought in California

Author
item FETTIG, CHRISTOPHER - Us Forest Service (FS)
item WUENSCHEL, AMARINA - Us Forest Service (FS)
item Balachowski, Jennifer
item BUTZ, RAMONA - Us Forest Service (FS)
item JACOBSEN, ANNA - California State University
item NORTH, MALCOLM - Us Forest Service (FS)
item Ostoja, Steven
item PRATT, BRANDON - Us Forest Service (FS)
item STANDIFORD, RICHARD - University Of California

Submitted to: Forest Service General Technical Reports
Publication Type: Government Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/1/2019
Publication Date: 12/9/2019
Citation: Fettig, C.A., Wuenschel, A., Balachowski, J.A., Butz, R.J., Jacobsen, A., North, M., Ostoja, S.M., Pratt, B., Standiford, R. 2019. Drought Management in California. Forest Service General Technical Reports. 71-93. https://doi.org/10.2737/WO-GTR-98.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.2737/WO-GTR-98

Interpretive Summary: The state of California is an excellent example of society’s vulnerability to drought. As the sixth largest economy in the world, California is home to nearly 39.3 million people and an agricultural and forestry sector of international significance. The most recent drought (2012–2016) in California was characterized by large precipitation deficits and abnormally high temperatures during both the wet and dry seasons. While consecutive years of drought are not uncommon in California, this event was the most severe in the last 1,200 years and may foreshadow future impacts of drought within the state. For example, using 21st century projections of warming and the RCP8.5 emissions scenario total snowpack is projected to decline by 85% during this century. Like most western states, mountain snowpacks are a critical resource in California, and supply water for multiple uses throughout much of the state.

Technical Abstract: The state of California is an excellent example of society’s vulnerability to drought. As the sixth largest economy in the world, California is home to nearly 39.3 million people and an agricultural and forestry sector of international significance. The most recent drought (2012–2016) in California was characterized by large precipitation deficits and abnormally high temperatures during both the wet and dry seasons. While consecutive years of drought are not uncommon in California, this event was the most severe in the last 1,200 years and may foreshadow future impacts of drought within the state. For example, using 21st century projections of warming and the RCP8.5 emissions scenario total snowpack is projected to decline by 85% during this century. Like most western states, mountain snowpacks are a critical resource in California, and supply water for multiple uses throughout much of the state.