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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #358072

Research Project: Cardiovascular Nutrition and Health

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: Tea consumption and longitudinal change in HDL cholesterol concentration in Chinese adults

Author
item Huang, Shue - Pennsylvania State University
item Li, Junjuan - Kailuan Hospital
item Wu, Yuntao - University Of South China
item Ranjbar, Sareh - Pennsylvania State University
item Xing, Aijun - Kailuan Hospital
item Zhao, Haiyan - Kailuan Hospital
item Want, Yanxiu - Kailuan Hospital
item Shearer, Gregory - Pennsylvania State University
item Lichtenstein, Alice - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Wu, Shouling - Kailuan Hospital
item Gao, Xiang - Pennsylvania State University

Submitted to: Journal of the American Heart Association
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/7/2018
Publication Date: 6/25/2018
Citation: Huang, S., Li, J., Wu, Y., Ranjbar, S., Xing, A., Zhao, H., Want, Y., Shearer, G.C., Lichtenstein, A.H., Wu, S., Gao, X. 2018. Tea consumption and longitudinal change in HDL cholesterol concentration in Chinese adults. Journal of the American Heart Association. 7(13):e008814. https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.118.008814.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.118.008814

Interpretive Summary: There is an inverse relationship between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and heart disease risk; the higher the HDL-C concentrations, the lower the risk. It has been proposed that tea consumption is associated with favorable lipid profiles. However, relation between tea consumption and age-related changes in HDL-C concentrations remains unclear, and longitudinal human data are limited. This study examined the relation between tea intake and 6-year longitudinal change in HDL-C concentrations in a Chinese community-based cohort. The cohort was composed of individuals living in China who were free of heart diseases and cancer at recruitment, and did not use cholesterol-lowering agents either at baseline or during the follow-up period. Tea consumption was assessed via a questionnaire in 2006 and was classified into four categories: never or <once/month, 1-3 times/month, 1-3 times/week, and = 4 times/week. In this Chinese cohort there was an inverse relationship between tea consumption and slower decrease in HDL-C concentrations. Interactions between tea consumption and age, sex, lifestyle scores and Metabolic Syndrome were identified. The associations between greater tea consumption and slower decrease in HDL-C concentrations were more pronounced in men, individuals aged 60 or older, individuals with a lower lifestyle score, and individuals with metabolic syndrome. These data suggest that tea consumption was associated with slower age-related decreases in HDL-C concentrations during 6 years of follow-up, hence would be predicted to have a favorable effect on heart disease risk.

Technical Abstract: Background: The relation between tea consumption and age-related changes in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations remains unclear, and longitudinal human data are limited. The aim of current study was to examine the relation between tea intake and longitudinal change in HDL-C concentrations. Methods and Results: Baseline (2006) tea consumption was assessed via a questionnaire, and plasma HDL-C concentrations were measured in 2006, 2008, 2010, and 2012 among 80 182 individuals (4912 years of age) who did not have cardiovascular diseases or cancer, or did not use cholesterol-lowering agents both at baseline (2006) and during the follow-up period (2006-2012). The associations between baseline tea consumption and rate of change in HDL-C concentrations were examined using generalized estimating equation models. Tea consumption was inversely associated with a decreased rate of HDL-C concentrations (P-trend <0.0001) in the fully adjusted model. The adjusted mean difference in the HDL-C decreased rate was 0.010 (95% confidence interval, 0.008, 0.012) mmol/L per year for tea consumers versus nonconsumers (never or less than once/month group). Interactions between tea consumption and age, sex, lifestyle scores, and metabolic syndrome (all P-interaction <0.0001) were identified. The associations between greater tea consumption and slower decrease in HDL-C concentrations were more pronounced in men, individuals aged 60 or older, individuals with a lower lifestyle score, and individuals with metabolic syndrome (all P-trend <0.0001). Conclusions: Tea consumption was associated with slower age-related decreases in HDL-C concentrations during 6 years of follow-up.