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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Gainesville, Florida » Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology » Mosquito and Fly Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #357237

Research Project: Biting Arthropod Surveillance and Control

Location: Mosquito and Fly Research

Title: Mosquito control research

Author
item Linthicum, Kenneth - Ken
item Unnash, Tom - University Of South Florida
item Rey, Jorge - University Of South Florida

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/31/2018
Publication Date: 8/28/2018
Citation: Linthicum, K., Unnash, T., Rey, J. 2018. Mosquito control research. Lloyd, A.M., C.R. Connelly, and D.B. Carlson (Eds.). Florida Coordinating Council on Mosquito Control. Florida Mosquito Control: The state of the mission as defined by mosquito controllers, regulators, and environmental managers. Vero Beach, FL: University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory. 1-5.

Interpretive Summary: The overall aim of mosquito control in Florida and elsewhere is to limit the impact of nuisance and disease carrying mosquitoes on residents and tourists, while simultaneously maintaining and, where possible, improving the environment. Mosquito control programs need to be based on solid scientifically based research that provides safe, effective, economical, and environmentally sensitive mosquito control technologies. The history, accomplishments, and needs of the principal university, government and private laboratories, and agencies involved in Florida's research effort are described. Without strong funding for mosquito control research and extension, these laboratories may be forced to conduct research in other more readily funded areas. Currently, mosquito control is losing some of its effective tools due to insecticide resistance, development and operational costs, and concern that some chemicals and/or techniques may be harmful to the environment. Research laboratories searching for new innovative methods and technology and verifying their safe use are critical to support mosquito control programs efforts to provide protection for Florida's citizens. The threat of emerging vector borne pathogens has affected and will continue to affect the well-being of Floridians and tourists. Without a strong mosquito control effort, Florida will be an uncomfortable and dangerous place to live and visit.

Technical Abstract: The goal of mosquito control is to limit the impact of nuisance and disease carrying mosquitoes on Florida residents and tourists, while simultaneously maintaining and, where possible, improving the environment. Mosquito control is too often in the middle of a conflict between citizens who may feel that mosquito control is insufficient and those people who believe mosquito control is harming the environment. To strike a balance, mosquito control programs need to be based on solid scientifically based research that provides safe, effective, economical, and environmentally sensitive mosquito control technologies. In the development of an effective mosquito control program, the most important concerns facing mosquito control today requiring research are: surveillance, mosquito biology, wetlands ecology, human-made mosquito problems, disease detection and prevention, repellents, improving attractants and traps, improving on existing chemical technology, non-target organisms, biocontrol including, sterile insect technique. The history, accomplishments, and needs of the principal university, government and private laboratories, and agencies involved in Florida's research effort are described. Without strong funding for mosquito control research and extension, these laboratories will be forced to conduct research in other more readily funded areas. Already, mosquito control is losing some of its effective tools due to insecticide resistance, development and operational costs, or concern that some chemicals and/or techniques may be harmful to the environment. Without research laboratories searching for new innovative methods and technology and verifying their safe use, mosquito control will have increasing difficulties providing protection for Florida's citizens at the level expected today. The threat of emerging vector borne pathogens has affected and will continue to affect the well-being of Floridians and tourists. Without a strong mosquito control effort, Florida will be an uncomfortable and dangerous place to live and visit.