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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #357187

Research Project: IPM Methods for Insect Pests of Orchard Crops

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Synthesis and characterization of multifunctional branched amphiphilic peptide bilayer conjugated gold nanoparticles

Author
item Natarajan, Pavithra - Kansas State University
item Sukhthankar, Pinakin - Kansas State University
item Changstrom, Jessica - Kansas State University
item Holland, Christopher - Former ARS Employee
item Barry, Shannon - Kansas State University
item Hunter, Wayne
item Sorenson, Christopher - Kansas State University
item Tomich, John - Kansas State University

Submitted to: ACS Omega
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/28/2018
Publication Date: 9/13/2018
Citation: Natarajan, P., Sukhthankar, P., Changstrom, J., Holland, C.S., Barry, S., Hunter, W.B., Sorenson, C.M., Tomich, J.M. 2018. Synthesis and characterization of multifunctional branched amphiphilic peptide bilayer conjugated gold nanoparticles. ACS Omega. https://doi:10.1021/acsomega.8b01633.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1021/acsomega.8b01633

Interpretive Summary: To solve problems with delivery of pest management products into insects and plants we developed Branched Amphiphilic Peptides, BAPC, which self-assemble into protein shells. We then combined these with spherical nanogold-spheres, linking assemblies in solution to form peptide bilayer delimited capsules. The BAPC form spheres which will contain the solution in which they form. The method provides a new encapsulation and delivery system for use in medicine, or the control of pests and pathogens.

Technical Abstract: A new method for production of novel Branched Amphiphilic Peptides, BAPC, which assemble into spherical nano-assemblies in solution. The BAPC assembled peptide bilayer delimited capsules which will contain peptides, nucleotides, and solutions. Gold nanoparticles 5 nanometer in size were used to bind the peptides using gold-thiol chemistry. Subsequent transition into an aqueous solution in the presence of excess peptides led to formation of the peptide bilayer on the gold surface. Transmission Electron Microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric analysis and Forster Resonance Energy transfer (FRET) techniques and analyses determined the binding of the peptides and quantified formation of the bilayer. These results support conclusions that BAPC self-assemble as a bilayer. The approach was exploited further to produce a bilayer coated magnetic nanoparticle. The BAPC provide a new delivery system into living cells, for use in medicine, or the control of pests and pathogens.