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Research Project: Intervention Strategies to Predict, Prevent and Control Disease Outbreaks Caused by Emerging Strains of Virulent Newcastle Disease Viruses

Location: Exotic & Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research

Title: Epidemiology, control, and prevention of Newcastle disease in endemic regions: Latin America

Author
item ABSALON, A.E. - Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro De Desarrollo De Productos Bioticos (CEPROBI)
item CORTES, D.V. - Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro De Desarrollo De Productos Bioticos (CEPROBI)
item LUCIO, E. - Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals
item Miller, Patti
item Afonso, Claudio

Submitted to: Veterinary Microbiology
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/7/2019
Publication Date: 3/15/2019
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/6444425
Citation: Absalon, A., Cortes, D., Lucio, E., Miller, P.J., Afonso, C.L. 2019. Epidemiology, control, and prevention of Newcastle disease in endemic regions: Latin America. Veterinary Microbiology. 51(5):1033-1048. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11250-019-01843-z.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11250-019-01843-z

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Newcastle disease (ND) has severe economic impact on the poultry industry worldwide and on wild birds, and has recently re-emerged in Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela, and Peru with dire consequences. The disease is caused by infections with one of the different strains of virulent avian Newcastle disease virus (NDV), recently renamed Avian Avulavirus 1. Here, we describe the molecular epidemiology of Latin American NDV, current control and prevention methods, including vaccines and vaccination protocols, as well as future strategies for control of ND. Because the productive, cultural, economic, social, and ecological conditions that facilitate poultry endemicity in South America are similar to those in the developing world, most of these problems and control strategies described here are applicable to other continents.