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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Animal Disease Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #355536

Research Project: Identification of Host Factors and Immunopathogenesis of Pneumonia in Domestic and Bighorn Sheep

Location: Animal Disease Research

Title: Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae associated with polymicrobial pneumonia in a free-ranging yearling caribou (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) from Alaska, USA

Author
item Rovani, Emma - Alaska Department Of Fish And Game
item Beckman, Kimberlee - Alaska Department Of Fish And Game
item Highland, Margaret - Maggie

Submitted to: Journal of Wildlife Diseases
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/14/2019
Publication Date: 2/15/2019
Citation: Rovani, E.R., Beckman, K.B., Highland, M.A. 2019. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae associated with polymicrobial pneumonia in a free-ranging yearling caribou (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) from Alaska, USA. Journal of Wildlife Diseases. https://www.jwildlifedis.org/doi/pdfplus/10.7589/2018-08-188.

Interpretive Summary: This manuscript represents the first documented case report of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae associated with polymicrobial bronchopneumonia in a wild animal (Caribou) outside of the subfamily Caprinae (sheep, goats, muskox). The impact of this finding is of importance to both wildlife management and domestic small ruminant owners. Current dogma states that this bacterium, recognized for its role in bighorn sheep pneumonia in the western region of North America, is only carried by and only impacts species within the taxonomic subfamily Caprinae. Since Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae can be difficult to identify by standard bacteria culture methods, typically requiring specific assays (molecular assays such as PCR) for identification, this manuscript will help inform diagnostic laboratories as well as submitting clinicians and wildlife personnel to look for the presence of this bacterium in species outside of the subfamily Caprinae. Considering the current proposals to eradicate Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in Western North America from domestic small ruminants, currently believed to be the original and primary source of this bacterium, it is vital to understand all host reservoirs, both domestic and wild.

Technical Abstract: Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae has to date been reported in association with respiratory disease only in members of the taxonomic subfamily Caprinae. This report represents the identification of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in a free-ranging yearling caribou (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) with polymicrobial bronchopneumonia.