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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #354345

Research Project: Energy Regulation and Obesity

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: Effectiveness of an energy management training course on employee well-being: a randomized controlled trial

Author
item Das, Sai Krupa - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Mason, Shawn - Johnson & Johnson Co
item Vail, Taylor - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Rogers, Gail - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Livingston, Kara - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Whelan, Jillian - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Chin, Meghan - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Blanchard, Caroline - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Turgiss, Jennifer - Johnson & Johnson Co
item Roberts, Susan - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University

Submitted to: American Journal of Health Promotion
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/2/2018
Publication Date: 5/28/2018
Citation: Das, S., Mason, S.T., Vail, T.A., Rogers, G.T., Livingston, K.A., Whelan, J.G., Chin, M.K., Blanchard, C.M., Turgiss, J.L., Roberts, S.B. 2018. Effectiveness of an energy management training course on employee well-being: a randomized controlled trial. American Journal of Health Promotion. https://doi.org/10.1177/0890117118776875.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0890117118776875

Interpretive Summary: While employee wellness programs have become more popular in recent years, few have been thoroughly evaluated. This article details a randomized controlled trial investigating the effectiveness of a 2.5-day intervention designed to enhance vitality and purpose in life in employees at worksites in the Greater Boston Area. As compared to a wait-listed control group, employees who received the intervention immediately demonstrated significant improvements in vitality and quality-of-life measures at six months. These results suggest that the intervention, though brief, could be a promising scalable option for improving the long-term wellbeing of employees.

Technical Abstract: Purpose: Programs focused on employee well-being have gained momentum in recent years, but few have been vigorously evaluated. This study evaluates the effectiveness of an intervention designed to enhance vitality and purpose in life by assessing changes in employee quality of life (QoL) and health-related behaviors. Design: A worksite-based randomized controlled trial. Setting: Twelve eligible worksites (8 randomized to the intervention group [IG] and 4 to the wait-listed control group [CG]). Participants: Employees (n = 240) at the randomized worksites. Intervention: A 2.5-day group-based behavioral intervention. Measures: Rand Medical Outcomes Survey (MOS) 36-item Short-Form (SF-36) vitality and QoL measures, Ryff Purpose in Life Scale, Center for Epidemiologic Studies questionnaire for depression, MOS sleep, body weight, physical activity, diet quality, and blood measures for glucose and lipids (which were used to calculate a cardio-metabolic risk score)obtained at baseline and 6 months. Analysis: General linear mixed models were used to compare least squares means or prevalence differences in outcomes between IG and CG participants. Results: As compared to CG, IG had a significantly higher mean 6-month change on the SF-36 vitality scale (P = .003) and scored in the highest categories for 5 of the remaining 7 SF-36 domains: general health (P = .014), mental health (P = .027), absence of role limitations due to physical problems (P = .026), and social functioning (P = .007). The IG also had greater improvements in purpose in life (P < .001) and sleep quality (index I, P = .024; index II, P = .021). No statistically significant changes were observed for weight, diet, physical activity, or cardiometabolic risk factors. Conclusion: An intensive 2.5-day intervention showed improvement in employee QoL and well-being over 6 months.