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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Mycology and Nematology Genetic Diversity and Biology Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #353748

Research Project: Enhancing Plant Protection through Fungal Systematics

Location: Mycology and Nematology Genetic Diversity and Biology Laboratory

Title: Genome resources for the stem and bark canker pathogens Corinectria fuckeliana, Neonectria hederae and N. punicea

Author
item Salgado-salazar, Catalina - Orise Fellow
item Crouch, Joanne

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/21/2018
Publication Date: 8/29/2018
Citation: Salgado-Salazar, C., Crouch, J. 2018. Genome resources for the stem and bark canker pathogens Corinectria fuckeliana, Neonectria hederae and N. punicea. Plant Disease. 103(1):389-391. https://doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-05-18-0904-A.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-05-18-0904-A

Interpretive Summary: Canker diseases of hardwood trees, conifers and fruit trees cause substantial losses worldwide in agriculture, forests, and natural ecosystems. These deadly canker diseases result when trees are infected by any of several different species from a family of fungi known as the Nectriaceae. To better understand the fungi causing these canker diseases, the genomes of four of the most deadly canker fungi were completely sequenced. This unique dataset of genome sequences will help us identify DNA and genes involved in the disease process. This information will also be useful for researchers developing methods to diagnose and control these destructive plant diseases.

Technical Abstract: Corinectria fuckeliana, N. hederae and N. punicea are fungi in the family Nectriaceae that cause canker diseases of numerous hardwood trees, conifers and woody perennials, often leading to plant mortality. Here, we report draft genome sequences for these three phytopathogenic fungal species. The genome sizes are consistent with those reported for other members of the Nectriaceae (28 to 43 Mb). These are the first genome resources available for C. fuckeliana, N. hederae and N. punicea. These genome sequences may provide insights into the mechanisms of virulence and pathogenicity employed by these three destructive plant pathogens, and are resources suitable for the development of molecular markers that could be used for species identification, diagnostic tools and barcodes, and population studies.