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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Bowling Green, Kentucky » Food Animal Environmental Systems Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #353229

Research Project: Developing Safe, Efficient and Environmentally Sound Management Practices for the Use of Animal Manure

Location: Food Animal Environmental Systems Research

Title: Abattoir based survey of bovine cystic echinococcosis in selected commercial abattoir in Ethiopia

Author
item Hiko, Adem - Ethiopia Haramaya University
item Ibrahim, Hassen - Ethiopia Haramaya University
item Agga, Getahun

Submitted to: Journal of Veterinary Science and Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/22/2018
Publication Date: 3/23/2018
Citation: Hiko, A., Ibrahim, H., Agga, G.E. 2018. Abattoir based survey of bovine cystic echinococcosis in selected commercial abattoir in Ethiopia. Journal of Veterinary Science and Technology. 9(2):527. doi: 10.4172/2157-7579.1000527.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4172/2157-7579.1000527

Interpretive Summary: Hydatidosis is a disease caused by the development of parasitic larvae in the internal organs of ruminants and humans. Ruminants acquire the infection through ingestion of feed contaminated with the parasitic eggs excreted from infected dogs and foxes. In turn, dogs and foxes are infected through consumption raw or uncooked meat containing the larval cyst. Humans acquire the infection through contact with infected dogs or when accidentally exposed to environments contaminated by eggs excreted by dogs and foxes. Hydatidosis is widespread in developing countries causing significant economic loss through condemnation of contaminated organs, and significant public health risk. Meat inspection is the principal critical control point to disrupt the parasitic life cycle. We conducted a study at a commercial beef processing plant located in Central Ethiopia to investigate the magnitude and its organ distribution, during meat inspection. Over half of the cattle inspected contained one or more cysts in one or more body organs regardless of the origin of the cattle. Hydatidosis was detected in all four cattle sources identified, indicating the disease is geographically widespread in the country. Most of the cysts were mainly located in the lungs followed by liver. Total financial loss due to organ condemnation alone was estimated at $3,353.77 per year. The widespread occurrence of hydatidosis at such high rate requires appropriate control measures to reduce the public health and economic impacts of the disease.

Technical Abstract: Hydatidosis is a widespread parasitic disease posing a significant public health and economic burden in developing countries. Abattoir survey was conducted to determine the prevalence of cystic echinococcosis (CE) in cattle, its organ distribution and to estimate financial loss due to organ condemnation. A total of 662 cattle originated from four different areas Ethiopia were examined during routine meat inspection. Bovine CE was observed in more than a half (51%) of all cattle studied. The prevalence of CE was significantly associated with the origin of the cattle and study month. Area specific prevalences were 44% (n=386) in Arsi, 30% (n=91) in Borana, 85% (n=80) in Jimma and 67% (n=105) in Mi’eso. The lowest prevalence (32%) was observed in February and the highest prevalence (75%) was observed in December. Of the animals positive for hydatid cyst (n=335), in 70% of them had cysts were found in the lungs followed by the liver (30%). Out of 386 multiple cysts observed 74% (285/386) of them were fertile and the remaining 26% (101/386) were calcified cysts. Bovine CE was estimated to cause a total financial loss of 3,353.77 US$ annually due to organ condemnation. The high prevalence of cystic echinococcosis observed warrants the need for appropriate control measures to reduce the public health and economic impacts of the disease.