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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Davis, California » Western Human Nutrition Research Center » Obesity and Metabolism Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #353092

Research Project: Improving Public Health by Understanding Diversity in Diet, Body, and Brain Interactions

Location: Obesity and Metabolism Research

Title: Prospective randomized controlled pilot study on the effects of almond consumption on skin lipids and wrinkles

Author
item FOOLAD, NEGAR - UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS
item VAUGHN, ALEXANDRA - UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS
item RYBAK, IRYNA - DREXEL UNIVERSITY
item BURNEY, WAQAS - UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS
item CHODUR, GWEN - UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS
item Newman, John
item STEINBERG, FRANCENE - UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS
item SIVAMANI, RAJA - UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS

Submitted to: Phytotherapy Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/14/2019
Publication Date: 10/1/2019
Citation: Foolad, N., Vaughn, A.R., Rybak, I., Burney, W., Chodur, G., Newman, J.W., Steinberg, F.M., Sivamani, R.K. 2019. Prospective randomized controlled pilot study on the effects of almond consumption on skin lipids and wrinkles. Phytotherapy Research. 2019:(33):3212–3217. https://doi.org/10.1002/ptr.6495.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/ptr.6495

Interpretive Summary: Almonds are a rich dietary source of fatty acids and antioxidants, and their consumption significantly changes blood lipid profiles. Modulation of the skin barrier improves several skin features including wrinkles. Almond consumption may modulate skin lipid secretions (i.e. sebum) and the barrier, and thus could contribute to the photo-aging defenses of the skin and the skin barrier. This study was designed to investigate the effects of almond consumption on facial sebum production and wrinkles using a prospective, investigator-blinded, randomized controlled trial design during 2016-2018. Participants were generally healthy postmenopausal females with fair complexions who were recruited from the UC Davis Dermatology clinic and nearby surrounding community. Participants consumed 20% of their daily energy consumption in either almonds or a calorie-matched nut-free snack for 16 weeks. Nuts and snacks were provided in individually wrapped packages. Measurements of trans-epidermal water loss, sebum production, and wrinkle width and severity were performed at 0, 8, and 16 weeks. Wrinkle assessments were made using standardized high-resolution facial photographs photograph and image analysis. Fifty healthy post-menopausal females were recruited, thirty-one participants were enrolled, and twenty-eight completed the study. Under photographic image analysis, the almond group had significantly decreased wrinkle severity and width compared to the control group at the 16-week time point (P<0.02). There were no significant changes in the skin barrier function measured by the TEWL (P=0.65) between the almond and control groups relative to baseline after 16 weeks. No adverse effects were reported. Therefore, our randomized controlled trial demonstrates that daily almond consumption can reduce wrinkle severity in postmenopausal females and thus may have natural anti-aging benefits.

Technical Abstract: IMPORTANCE: Almonds are a rich dietary source of fatty acids and antioxidants, and their supplementation is known to significantly modulate serum lipid profiles. Modulation of the skin barrier has been shown to improve several skin features including wrinkles, and the effects of almond on the skin’s lipid barrier and on the appearance of wrinkles have not yet been elucidated. Almond modulation of sebum and the barrier may contribute to the photoaging defenses of the skin and the skin barrier. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of almond consumption on facial sebum production and wrinkles. DESIGN: This was a prospective, investigator-blinded, randomized controlled trial during 2016-2018 in which subjects consumed 20% of their daily energy consumption in either almonds or a calorie-matched snack for 16 weeks. SETTING: This single-center study was completed at the University of California Davis Dermatology clinic. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were a volunteer sample of generally healthy postmenopausal females with Fitzpatrick skin types 1 and 2 who were recruited from the UC Davis Dermatology clinic and nearby surrounding community. INTERVENTIONS: The almond group participants received almonds equal to 20% of their average daily energy consumption to consume daily for the duration of the study. The control group received calorie-matched commercially available nut-free snacks as individually wrapped food products. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURES: A facial photograph and image analysis system was used to obtain standardized high-resolution photographs and information on wrinkle width and severity at 0, 8, and 16 weeks. Measurements of transepidermal water loss and sebum production were also completed at 0, 8, and 16 weeks. RESULTS: Fifty healthy post-menopausal females were recruited, thirty-one participants were enrolled, and twenty-eight completed the study. Under photographic image analysis, the almond group had significantly decreased wrinkle severity and width compared to the control group at the 16-week time point (P<0.02). There were no significant changes in the skin barrier function measured by the TEWL (P=0.65) between the almond and control groups relative to baseline after 16 weeks. No adverse effects were reported. CONCLUSION: Our randomized controlled trial demonstrates that daily almond consumption may reduce wrinkle severity in postmenopausal females to potentially have natural anti-aging benefits. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT02954315