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Research Project: Green Biopesticides: Identification

Location: Natural Products Utilization Research

Title: Isolation and identification of mosquito biting deterrents from the North American mosquito repelling folk remedy plant, Matricaria discoidea DC

Author
item Cantrell, Charles
item Ali, Abbas - University Of Mississippi
item Jones, A. Maxwell - University Of Guelph

Submitted to: PLoS One
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/16/2018
Publication Date: 10/31/2018
Citation: Cantrell, C.L., Ali, A., Jones, A.P. 2018. Isolation and identification of mosquito biting deterrents from the North American mosquito repelling folk remedy plant, Matricaria discoidea DC. PLoS One. 13(10):e0206594. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0206594.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0206594

Interpretive Summary: Pineapple weed (Matricaria discoidea) has documented use as an insect repellent by various indigenous peoples of North America. This investigation was conducted to evaluate this practice and systematically identify chemical constituents responsible for any insect repelling effect by utilizing a mosquito (Aedes aegypti) biting deterrent assay approach. Essential oil from dried M. discoidea was the most bioactive crude extract generated and was as effective as DEET. The most active compounds were determined to be a-terpineol, spathulenol, and neryl isovalerate. Large cage in vitro evaluation of pure compounds isolated from M. discoidea indicated a-terpineol to be the most active compound providing complete protection similar to DEET. This is the first report on the mosquito repellency of neryl isovalerate and scientific evidence reported here validates the traditional use of M. discoidea as a biting-insect deterrent.

Technical Abstract: Matricaria discoidea DC. (Asteraceae) has documented use as an insect repellent by various indigenous peoples of North America. This investigation was conducted to evaluate this practice and systematically identify chemical constituents responsible for any insect repelling effect by utilizing a mosquito (Aedes aegypti) biting deterrent bioactivity-directed purification approach. Hydrodistilled oil from dried aerial parts of M. discoidea was the most bioactive crude extract generated and was as effective as DEET. Fractionation of this extract, followed by re-evaluation for mosquito biting deterrence using the K & D bioassay, produced many active fractions that were subsequently evaluated by spectroscopic techniques and the most active compounds were determined to be alpha-terpineol, spathulenol, and neryl isovalerate. A & K large cage in vitro evaluation of pure compounds isolated from M. discoidea indicated alpha-terpineol to be the most active compound providing complete protection at 25 micrograms/cm2. This is the first report on the mosquito repellency of neryl isovalerate and scientific evidence reported here validates the traditional use of M. discoidea as a biting-insect deterrent.