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Research Project: Childhood Obesity Prevention

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

Title: The relation between polyphenols and body composition in US Hispanics/Latinos: Results from the Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) study of Latinos nutrition and physical activity assessment study

Author
item MAKAREM, NOUR - Columbia University - New York
item MOSSAVAR-RAHMANI, YASMIN - Albert Einstein College Of Medicine
item SOTRES-ALVAREZ, DANIELA - University Of North Carolina
item HUA, SIMIN - Albert Einstein College Of Medicine
item WONG, WILLIAM - Children'S Nutrition Research Center (CNRC)
item VAN HORN, LINDA - Northwestern University
item DAVIGLUS, MARTHA - University Of Illinois
item FRANKE, ADRIAN - University Of Hawaii
item GELLMAN, MARC - University Of Miami
item KAPLAN, ROBERT - Albert Einstein College Of Medicine
item BEASLEY, JEANNETTE - New York University School Of Medicine

Submitted to: Current Developments in Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/28/2017
Publication Date: 9/29/2017
Citation: Makarem, N., Mossavar-Rahmani, Y., Sotres-Alvarez, D., Hua, S., Wong, W.W., Van Horn, L., Daviglus, M.L., Franke, A.A., Gellman, M.D., Kaplan, R.C., Beasley, J.M. 2017. The relation between polyphenols and body composition in US Hispanics/Latinos: Results from the Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) study of Latinos nutrition and physical activity assessment study. Current Developments in Nutrition. 1(11):e001115. https://doi.org/10.3945/cdn.117.001115.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3945/cdn.117.001115

Interpretive Summary: Polyphenols are natural plant products found in fruits, vegetables, coffee, tea, wine and chocolate that might help reduce body weight and body fat. Hispanics/Latinos have high rate of obesity but little is known how polyphenols might relate to their body mass index and body fat. We recruited 442 Hispanics/Latinos into the study at four study sites: Chicago, Illinois; Miami, Florida; Bronx, New York; and San Diego, California. In the study, we measured their body mass index based on weight and height and their body fat using a standard stable isotope dilution method. Their polyphenol intakes were based on the amounts of polyphenols found in their urine samples collected over a 24-hour period. The study showed that for every 50% increase in one of the polyphenols, urolithin A, there was a 0.4-unit decrease in body mass index. For every 50% increase in two of the polyphenols, resveratrol and urolithin A, there was a 1% and 0.4% decrease in percentage of body fat, respectively. Long-term study is needed to confirm the health benefits of polyphenols against obesity in Hispanics/Latinos.

Technical Abstract: Polyphenols offer high antioxidant potential that may protect against chronic diseases. Epidemiologic evidence documenting their influence on body composition and obesity risk is limited, particularly among Hispanics/Latinos who are disproportionately prone to obesity. The aims of this study were to evaluate cross-sectional associations of urinary polyphenols with body mass index (BMI) and body fat percentage (%BF) in a diverse Hispanic/Latino population and to assess the reliability of polyphenol measurements. Participants were 442 adults from the Study of Latinos/Nutrition and Physical Activity Assessment Study (SOLNAS) aged 18–74 y. Doubly labeled water was used as an objective recovery biomarker of energy. Polyphenol excretion from 24-h urine samples was assessed. Measures were repeated in a subsample (n = 90) to provide a reliability measure. Anthropometric measures were obtained by trained personnel, and %BF was measured by 18O dilution. Linear regression models were used to evaluate multivariable associations between body composition and polyphenols. Spearman correlation coefficients between BMI and %BF with polyphenols and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between polyphenol measures were computed. A weak correlation was observed for resveratrol and %BF (r = 20.11, P = 0.02). In multivariable-adjusted regression models, weak inverse associations were observed for resveratrol and urolithin A with %BF [B +/- SE: -0.010 +/- 0.004 (P = 0.007) and -0.004 +/- 0.002 (P = 0.03), respectively]. For every 50% increase in these urinary polyphenols, there was a 1% and 0.4% decrease in %BF. Urolithin A was inversely associated with BMI (b+/-SE: -0.004 +/-0.002; P = 0.02) and with 5% lower odds of obesity in models not adjusted for total energy expenditure (TEE; OR: 0.95; 95% CI: 0.91, 0.99; P = 0.02). For every 50% increase in urolithin A, there was a 0.4-unit decrease in BMI. Associations were attenuated after adjustment for TEE. Reliability study findings were indicative of weak to moderate correlations (ICCs: 0.11–0.65), representing a degree of within-person variation in polyphenol biomarkers. Although associations were weak, resveratrol and urolithin A were inversely associated with obesity. Repeated polyphenol urine measures could clarify their long-term impact on body adiposity.