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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #352861

Research Project: Cardiovascular Nutrition and Health

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: Low-calorie sweetened beverages and cardiometabolic health: a science advisory from the American Heart Association

Author
item Johnson, Rachel - University Of Vermont
item Lichtenstein, Alice - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Anderson, Cheryl - University Of California
item Carson, Joann - University Of Texas
item Despres, Jean-pierre - University Of Laval
item Hu, Frank - Harvard University
item Kris-etherton, Penny - Pennsylvania University
item Otten, Jennifer - University Of Washington
item Towfighi, Amytis - University Of Southern California
item Wylie-rosett, Judith - Albert Einstein College Of Medicine

Submitted to: Circulation
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/22/2018
Publication Date: 7/30/2018
Citation: Johnson, R.K., Lichtenstein, A.H., Anderson, C.A., Carson, J.S., Despres, J., Hu, F., Kris-Etherton, P.M., Otten, J., Towfighi, A., Wylie-Rosett, J. 2018. Low-calorie sweetened beverages and cardiometabolic health: a science advisory from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 138(9):e126-e140. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000569.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000569

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: In the United States, 32% of beverages consumed by adults and 19% of beverages consumed by children in 2007-2010 were beverages containing low calorie sweeteners (LCS). Among all foods and beverages containing LCS, beverages represent the largest proportion of LCS consumption worldwide. This Advisory reviews evidence from observational studies and clinical trials assessing the cardiometabolic outcomes of LCS beverages. It summarizes the positions of government agencies and other health organizations on LCS beverages and identifies research needs on the effects of LCS beverages on energy balance and cardiometabolic health. The advisory concludes that it appears prudent not to recommend regular and long-term consumption of LCS beverages, particularly in children. Individuals who are high consumers of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) may use LCS beverages as a short-term replacement strategy to reduce their intakes of SSBs. However, self-reported consumption of both SSBs and LCS beverages has been declining in the US and therefore some people appear to be reducing their intake of SSBs without necessarily substituting LCS beverages. Thus the use of other alternatives to SSBs, with a focus on water, is encouraged.