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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Urbana, Illinois » Soybean/maize Germplasm, Pathology, and Genetics Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #352829

Research Project: Integrated Management of Soybean Pathogens and Pests

Location: Soybean/maize Germplasm, Pathology, and Genetics Research

Title: Two aphid species, Phorodon cannabis and Rhopalosiphum rufiabdominale, identified as potential pests on industrial hemp, Cannabis sativa L., in the US Midwest

Author
item Lagos-kutz, Doris
item Potter, Bruce - University Of Minnesota
item Difonzo, Christina - Michigan State University
item Russell, Howard - Michigan State University
item Hartman, Glen

Submitted to: Crop, Forage & Turfgrass Management
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/20/2018
Publication Date: 10/4/2018
Citation: Lagos-Kutz, D.M., Potter, B., Difonzo, C., Russell, H., Hartman, G.L. 2018. Two aphid species, Phorodon cannabis and Rhopalosiphum rufiabdominale, identified as potential pests on industrial hemp, Cannabis sativa L., in the US Midwest. Crop, Forage & Turfgrass Management. 4:180032. doi:10.2134/cftm2018.04.0032.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.2134/cftm2018.04.0032

Interpretive Summary: Cannabis sativa is indigenous to eastern Asia and is grown for industrial fiber, seed oil, medicinal and recreational uses. In the USA, cultivation has increased as many states now allow the plant to be grown for medical and some for recreational purposes. Records of aphids that feed on C. sativa include Aphis fabae, Aphis sp., Aulacorthum solani, Myzus persicae, and Phorodon cannabis. These species are world-wide in distribution except Aphis sp. and P. cannabis. The distribution of P. cannabis was limited to central, eastern and southern Europe, across Asia and Japan, and northern Africa. There were no formal reports of P. cannabis from the USA until 2017 when P. cannabis were caught in the Suction Trap Network in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. We will continue to monitor for P. cannabis through this network to keep researchers, extension agents, and producers aware of the dispersal of this invasive species. This information is important to growers, extension personnel, and others interested in aphid taxonomy and distribution.

Technical Abstract: Cannabis sativa L. is indigenous to eastern Asia and is grown for industrial fiber, seed oil, medicinal and recreational uses. This plant is well known since ancient times for its medicinal and textile uses. In the USA, cultivation has increased as many states now allow the plant to be grown for medical and some for recreational purposes because of its rich reserve of phytochemicals. Records of aphids that feed on C. sativa include Aphis fabae, Aphis sp., Aulacorthum solani, Myzus persicae, and Phorodon cannabis. These species are world wide in distribution except Aphis sp. and P. cannabis. The distribution of P. cannabis was limited to central, eastern and southern Europe, across Asia and Japan, and northern Africa. There were no formal reports of P. cannabis from the USA until 2017 when P. cannabis were caught in the Suction Trap Network in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. We will continue to monitor for P. cannabis through this network to keep researchers, extension agents, and producers aware of the dispersal of this invasive species.