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ARS Home » Plains Area » College Station, Texas » Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center » Crop Germplasm Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #352734

Research Project: Identification of Resistance in Sorghum to Fungal Pathogens and Characterization of Pathogen Population Structure

Location: Crop Germplasm Research

Title: GWAS analysis of sorghum association panel lines identifies SNPs associated with disease response to Texas isolates of Colletotrichum sublineola

Author
item Prom, Louis
item Ahn, Ezekiel - Texas A&M University
item Isakeit, Thomas - Texas A&M University
item Magill, Clint - Texas A&M University

Submitted to: Theoretical and Applied Genetics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/16/2019
Publication Date: 1/28/2019
Citation: Prom, L.K., Ahn, E., Isakeit, T., Magill, C. 2019. GWAS analysis of sorghum association panel lines identifies SNPs associated with disease response to Texas isolates of Colletotrichum sublineola. Theoretical and Applied Genetics. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00122-019-03285-5.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00122-019-03285-5

Interpretive Summary: Anthracnose is one the most destructive fungal diseases of sorghum. The fungus attacks all parts of the plant and can cause yield losses of up to 100% in infected fields. To determine which genes contribute to resistance to the disease, hundreds of lines from the Sorghum Association Panel (SAP) were screened. The results showed that some of the SAP lines possess genes that play a role in host defense. This work is significant because it suggests that these lines have potential for use in breeding, as well as for future tests to verify a role for these genes in active host defense.

Technical Abstract: Sorghum Association Panel (SAP) lines were scored over several years for response to Colletotrichum sublineola, the causal agent of the disease anthracnose. Known resistant and susceptible lines were included each year to verify successful inoculation. Over 79,000 single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) loci from a publicly available genotype by sequencing dataset available for the SAP lines were used with TASSEL association mapping software to identify chromosomal locations that differ in disease response. When the top scoring SNPs were mapped to the published sorghum genome, in each case, the nearest annotated gene has precedence for a role in host defense.