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ARS Home » Plains Area » Grand Forks, North Dakota » Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center » Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #352693

Research Project: Food Factors to Prevent Obesity and Related Diseases

Location: Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research

Title: Trends in linoleic acid intake in the United States adult population: NHANES 1999-2014

Author
item Raatz, Susan
item Conrad, Zach
item Jahns, Lisa

Submitted to: Prostaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/25/2018
Publication Date: 6/1/2018
Citation: Raatz, S.K., Conrad, Z.S., Jahns, L.A. 2018. Trends in linoleic acid intake in the United States adult population: NHANES 1999-2014. Prostaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids. 133:23-28. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.plefa.2018.04.006.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.plefa.2018.04.006

Interpretive Summary: Linoleic acid (LA), the primary polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in the US diet, is an essential fatty acid. LA is available from a wide variety of foods, although it is primarily sourced from plant seed oils. Reported dietary intake from the National Health and Examination Surveys from waves 1999-2014 was evaluated. We found that US adults meet intake recommendation for LA and observed a trend of increasing intake of LA in the US overall and by sub-categories of age, sex, education, race/ethnicity, and income-to-poverty ratio.

Technical Abstract: Linoleic acid (LA), the primary polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in the US diet, is an essential fatty acid. LA is available from a wide variety of foods, although it is primarily sourced from plant seed oils. Individual-level data on demography and food and nutrient intake were acquired from the NHANES waves 1999-2000, 2001-2002, 2003-2004, 2005-2006, 2007-2008, 2009-2010, 2011-2012, and 2013-2014. Mean daily intake of (LA) was estimated for each survey wave overall, and by age, gender, educational attainment, race/ethnicity, and income-to-poverty ratio. Linear temporal (1999-2014) trends in LA intake were estimated using univariate linear regression tests, with P<0.05 and a two-tailed distribution. We found that US adults meet intake recommendation for LA and observed a trend of increasing intake of LA in the US overall and by sub-categories of age, sex, education, race/ethnicity, and income-to-poverty ratio.