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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #352560

Research Project: Sarcopenia, Nutrition, and Physical Activity

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: Social participation modifies the effect of a structured physical activity program on major mobility disability among older adults: results from the LIFE study

Author
item Corbett, Duane - UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
item Rejeski, Jack - WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY
item Tudor-locke, Catrine - UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS
item Glynn, Nancy - UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH
item Kritchevsky, Stephen - WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY
item Mcdermott, Mary - NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
item Church, Timothy - PENNINGTON BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTER
item Fielding, Roger - JEAN MAYER HUMAN NUTRITION RESEARCH CENTER ON AGING AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY
item Gill, Thomas - YALE UNIVERSITY
item King, Abby - STANFORD UNIVERSITY
item Miller, Michael - WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY
item Chen, Haiying - WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY
item Pahor, Marco - UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
item Manini, Todd - UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Submitted to: Journals of Gerontology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/6/2017
Publication Date: 5/8/2017
Citation: Corbett, D.B., Rejeski, J.W., Tudor-Locke, C., Glynn, N.W., Kritchevsky, S.B., McDermott, M., Church, T., Fielding, R.A., Gill, T.M., King, A.C., Miller, M.E., Chen, H., Pahor, M., Manini, T. 2017. Social participation modifies the effect of a structured physical activity program on major mobility disability among older adults: results from the LIFE study. Journals of Gerontology. https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbx051.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbx051

Interpretive Summary: We examined the role social participation as a modifier of the effects of a structured physical activity program (PA) compared to a health education control group (HE) in 1,635 adults aged 78 years, 67.2% women at risk for mobility disability. Participants who had a high degree of social participation and were randomized to the PA group had a significantly lower risk of becoming mobility disabled compared to those with low social participation. These results suggest that being socially active confers important benefits in terms of your response to a structured physical activity program.

Technical Abstract: Objectives: To investigate whether baseline social participation modifies the effect of a long-term structured physical activity (PA) program on major mobility disability (MMD). Methods: 1,635 sedentary adults (70-89 years) with physical limitations were randomized to either a structured PA or health education (HE) intervention. Social participation was defined categorically at baseline. High social participation was defined as attending organized group functions at least once per week and visiting with noncohabitating friends and family >/= 7 hr per week. Anything less was considered limited social participation. Participants performed a standardized walking test at baseline and every 6 months for up to 42 months. MMD was defined as the loss in the ability to walk 400 m. Results: There was a significant intervention by social participation interaction (p = .003). Among individuals with high levels of social participation, those randomized to PA had significantly lower incidence of MMD (hazard ratio [HR], 0.43 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.27-0.68]; p < .01) than those randomized to HE. Individuals with limited social participation showed no mobility benefit of the PA intervention when compared with their HE counterparts (HR, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.77-1.11]; p = .40). Discussion: Our findings suggest that baseline social participation is an important factor for the success of a PA intervention aimed at delaying mobility disability.