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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » National Germplasm Resources Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #352313

Research Project: Characterizing and Detecting Pathogens to Ensure Safe Exchange of Plant Germplasm

Location: National Germplasm Resources Laboratory

Title: Structure and genome organization of a novel Fiji Strain of sweet potato vein clearing virus identified by high-throughput sequencing

Author
item Wu, Liping - Nanchang University
item Liu, Huawei - China Agricultural University
item Abad, Jorge - Animal And Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
item French, Ronald - Animal And Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
item Li, Ruhui

Submitted to: Archives of Virology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/7/2018
Publication Date: 6/14/2018
Citation: Wu, L., Liu, H., Abad, J., French, R., Li, R. 2018. Structure and genome organization of a novel Fiji Strain of sweet potato vein clearing virus identified by high-throughput sequencing. Archives of Virology. https://doi.org/10.1128/genomeA.00462-18.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1128/genomeA.00462-18

Interpretive Summary: Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] is an important root/tuber crop worldwide, especially in Africa and Asia. Mixed infections of several viruses cause sweet potato viral disease (SPVD), a devastating disease that can reduce yields up to 80-90%. In this study, the complete genomic sequence of an isolate of sweet potato vein clearing virus from the Fiji Islands was determined. This virus can be one of the causal agents of SPVD. Analyses showed the Fijian isolate is similar to a South American isolate in both genetics and symptom expression. The research provides the information necessary to understand how the virus evolved, and to develop better detection and diagnostic methods for it.

Technical Abstract: The complete genome of a Fijian isolate of Sweet potato vein clearing virus was determined from a sweet potato accession. Sequence comparisons revealed that it had the highest nucleotide sequence identity of 94.6% with the previously described complete genome of a Dominican isolate. The virus was mechanically transmitted to a Nicotiana spp.