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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Aberdeen, Idaho » Small Grains and Potato Germplasm Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #352288

Research Project: Potato Genetic Improvement for Enhanced Tuber Quality and Greater Productivity and Sustainability in Western U.S. Production

Location: Small Grains and Potato Germplasm Research

Title: Evaluation of genetic diversity among Russet potato clones and varieties from breeding programs across the United States

Author
item BALI, SAPINDER - Oregon State University
item PATEL, GIRIJESH - University Of South Alabama
item Novy, Richard - Rich
item VINING, KELLY - Oregon State University
item THOMPSON, ASUNTA - North Dakota State University
item BROWN, CHUCK - Retired ARS Employee
item HOLM, DAVID - Colorado State University
item PORTER, GREGORY - University Of Maine
item ENDLEMAN, JEFFREY - University Of Wisconsin
item SATHUVALLI, VIDYASAGAR - Oregon State University

Submitted to: PLoS ONE
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/13/2018
Publication Date: 8/1/2018
Citation: Bali, S., Patel, G., Novy, R.G., Vining, K., Thompson, A., Brown, C., Holm, D., Porter, G., Endleman, J., Sathuvalli, V. 2018. Evaluation of genetic diversity among Russet potato clones and varieties from breeding programs across the United States. PLoS One. 13(8): e0201415. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0201415.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0201415

Interpretive Summary: DNA fingerprinting using 23 molecular markers was used in the evaluation of 267 breeding clones and varieties representing the potato market class having oblong-long tubers with russet skin. The objective was an assessment of the level of genetic diversity within this market class which would be beneficial information for potato breeders and geneticists in the development of new russet-skinned potato varieties. The level of genetic diversity was found to be sufficient for continued genetic gains with a unique set of 7 of the original 23 molecular markers identified as providing differentiation among the breeding clones and varieties examined in this study.

Technical Abstract: DNA fingerprinting is a powerful tool for plant diversity studies, cultivar identification, and germplasm conservation and management. In breeding programs, fingerprinting and diversity analysis provide an insight into the extent of genetic variability available in the breeding material, which in turn helps breeders to maintain a pool of highly diverse genotypes by avoiding the selection of closely related parents. Oblong-long tubers having russet skin characterize russet potato, a primary potato market class in the United States, and especially in the western production regions. The aim of this study was to estimate the level of genetic diversity within this market class, utilizing potato clones and varieties from breeding programs across the United States. A collection of 267 breeding clones and varieties were fingerprinted using 23 highly polymorphic genome-wide simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, resulting in 155 polymorphic loci. The number of alleles produced per SSR varied from 03 to 11, with an average of 6.7 alleles per marker. The polymorphic information content and expected heterozygosity of SSRs ranged from 0.36 to 0.77 and 0.46 to 0.79 with an average of 0.65 and 0.70, respectively. Out of these 23 markers, we propose a set of 07 SSR markers sufficient to fingerprint and differentiate among the Russet clones used in this study. Phylogenetic analysis of the clones suggest that there is sufficient diversity across the breeding material and the diversity has been evenly distributed among all the regional breeding programs.