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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Kearneysville, West Virginia » Appalachian Fruit Research Laboratory » Innovative Fruit Production, Improvement, and Protection » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #352057

Research Project: Integrated Orchard Management and Automation for Deciduous Tree Fruit Crops

Location: Innovative Fruit Production, Improvement, and Protection

Title: Improved trap designs and retention mechanisms for Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae)

Author
item RICE, KEVIN - UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI
item Morrison Iii, William - Rob
item SHORT, BRENT
item ACEBES-DORIA, ANGEL - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item BERGH, CHRISTOPHER - VIRGINIA TECH
item Leskey, Tracy

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/9/2018
Publication Date: 7/3/2018
Citation: Rice, K.B., Morrison III, W.R., Short, B.D., Acebes-Doria, A., Bergh, C., Leskey, T.C. 2018. Improved trap designs and retention mechanisms for Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae). Journal of Economic Entomology. https://doi.org/10.1093/jee/toy185.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/jee/toy185

Interpretive Summary: While the invasive brown marmorated stink bug can be successfully monitored with ground-deployed tall black pyramid traps, this system is costly and requires considerable time to deploy, service and maintain. Here, we evaluated other trap types that may be better suited for monitoring this invasive species in agricultural production. We evaluated modified pyramid traps (lures deployed on the outside), a canopy-deployed small pyramid, a pipe trap, delta traps, and yellow sticky cards in 2015 and 2016 in commercial apple and peach orchards in 2015 and 2016. Among trap types, modified pyramid and pipe traps were most effective, capturing more adults than all other trap designs. Adult captures in small canopy-deployed pyramid, delta, and yellow sticky traps were lower, but significantly correlated with the standard black pyramid indicating they, too, provided information as to presence, abundance and seasonal activity of this invasive stink bug. Based on these results, we believe that simpler trap designs is likely an option for brown marmorated stink bug and will enable broader adoption by the grower community.

Technical Abstract: Current monitoring systems for the invasive Halyomorpha halys in orchard agroecosystems rely on ground-deployed tall black pyramid traps baited with the two-component H. halys aggregation pheromone and pheromone synergist. Pyramid traps are comparatively costly, require considerable time to deploy and service, and may not be best suited to grower needs. Therefore, we evaluated other traps for H. halys, including modified pyramid traps (lures deployed on the outside), a canopy-deployed small pyramid, a pipe trap, delta traps, and yellow sticky cards in 2015 and 2016 in commercial apple and peach orchards. We also compared various H. halys killing agents for use in standard pyramid trap collection jars, including VaporTape kill strips, cattle ear tags, and plastic netting treated with various pyrethroids. Finally, we evaluated the effect of positioning the lures inside versus outside the collection jar on standard pyramid traps on overall captures. Among trap types, modified pyramid and pipe traps were most effective, capturing more adults than all other trap designs. Adult captures in small canopy-deployed pyramid, delta, and yellow sticky traps were lower, but significantly correlated with the standard black pyramid. Placing lures on the outside of collection jars on pyramid traps resulted in significantly greater captures and insecticide-impregnated netting was as effective for retaining bugs as VaporTape strips. These studies demonstrate that trapping systems for H. halys can be simplified and improved by modifying the trap design, lure deployment location and/or killing agent.