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ARS Home » Plains Area » El Reno, Oklahoma » Grazinglands Research Laboratory » Agroclimate and Natural Resources Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #351440

Research Project: Towards Resilient Agricultural Systems to Enhance Water Availability, Quality, and Other Ecosystem Services under Changing Climate and Land Use

Location: Agroclimate and Natural Resources Research

Title: Responses of gross primary production of grasslands and croplands to drought and pluvial events and irrigation during 2010-2016, Oklahoma, USA

Author
item Doughty, Russel - University Of Oklahoma
item Xiao, Xiangming - University Of Oklahoma
item Wu, Xiaocui - University Of Oklahoma
item Zhang, Yao - University Of Oklahoma
item Bajgain, Rajen - University Of Oklahoma
item Zhou, Zhenhua - University Of Oklahoma
item Qin, Yuanwei - University Of Oklahoma
item Mccarthy, Heather - University Of Oklahoma
item Friedman, Jack - University Of Oklahoma
item Basara, Jeff - University Of Oklahoma
item Steiner, Jean
item Wagle, Pradeep

Submitted to: Agricultural Water Management
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/2/2018
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: To accurately estimate carbon cycling and food production, it is essential to understand how gross primary production (GPP) of irrigated and non-irrigated grasslands and croplands respond to drought and pluvial events. Oklahoma experienced extreme drought in 2011 and record-breaking precipitation in 2015, thus providing an opportunity to study such changes in GPP for grasslands and croplands. This study analyzes annual GPP of grasslands, winter wheat, other C3 croplands, and C4 croplands in Caddo County of western Oklahoma from 2010 through 2016 for lands that did or did not have an irrigation permit. For each land use, annual GPP from the 2011 drought and pluvial 2015 were compared with mean GPP from the other 5 years of the study period. The results show that for the 2011 drought: 1) non-permitted C4 croplands had the largest percentage decrease (-41%) in GPP from the 5-year reference mean, but irrigation-permitted C4 croplands had no significant decrease; 2) GPP was significantly lower than the 5-year reference mean for all non- C4 vegetation types, regardless of water rights; 3) GPP for non-permitted lands were more affected by drought than irrigation-permitted lands, except for grasslands, which had similar percentage reductions in GPP (-35%). Results for the pluvial year 2015 indicate that: 1) GPP was significantly higher for grasslands, winter wheat, and non-permitted C3 croplands than the 5-year reference mean; 2) there was no significant difference in GPP for irrigation-permitted C3 croplands or non-permitted C4 croplands; and 3) GPP for C4 irrigation-permitted croplands was 9% lower than the 5-year reference mean.

Technical Abstract: To accurately estimate carbon cycling and food production, it is essential to understand how gross primary production (GPP) of irrigated and non-irrigated grasslands and croplands respond to drought and pluvial events. Oklahoma experienced extreme drought in 2011 and record-breaking precipitation in 2015, thus providing an opportunity to study such changes in GPP for grasslands and croplands. This study analyzes annual GPP of irrigation-permitted and non-permitted grasslands, winter wheat, other C3 croplands, and C4 croplands in Caddo County of western Oklahoma from 2010 through 2016. For each land class, annual GPP from the 2011 drought and pluvial 2015 were compared with mean GPP from the other 5 years of the study period. The results show that for the 2011 drought: 1) non-permitted C4 croplands had the largest percentage decrease (-41%) in GPP from the 5-year reference mean, but irrigation-permitted C4 croplands had no significant decrease; 2) GPP was significantly lower than the 5-year reference mean for all non- C4 vegetation types, regardless of water rights; 3) GPP for non-permitted lands were more affected by drought than irrigation-permitted lands, except for grasslands, which had similar percentage reductions in GPP (-35%). Results for the pluvial year 2015 indicate that: 1) GPP was significantly higher for grasslands, winter wheat, and non-permitted C3 croplands than the 5-year reference mean; 2) there was no significant difference in GPP for irrigation-permitted C3 croplands or non-permitted C4 croplands; and 3) GPP for C4 irrigation-permitted croplands was 9% lower than the 5-year reference mean.