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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Exotic & Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #351091

Research Project: Intervention Strategies to Prevent and Control Disease Outbreaks Caused by Emerging Strains of Avian Influenza Viruses

Location: Exotic & Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research

Title: Mitigation strategies to reduce the generation and transmission of airborne highly pathogenic influenza virus particles during processing of infected poultry

Author
item Bertran, Kateri - Consultant
item Clark, Andrew - Consultant
item Swayne, David

Submitted to: International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/29/2018
Publication Date: 5/29/2018
Citation: Bertran, K., Clark, A., Swayne, D.E. 2018. Mitigation strategies to reduce the generation and transmission of airborne highly pathogenic influenza virus particles during processing of infected poultry. International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health. 221(6):893-900. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheh.2018.05.013.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheh.2018.05.013

Interpretive Summary: The H5N1 deadly avian influenza viruses have been transmitted through the air during home or live-poultry market slaughter of infected poultry in poor, developing countries resulting in infection between poultry and from poultry to humans. In our study, we demonstrated simple, practical changes in the processing of H5N1 virus-infected chickens such as using a disposable plastic bag, a universally available cooking pot widely used in Egypt (halla), or a covered bucket significantly reduces generation of virus in air. Similarly, using vaccinated chickens prevented virus in air. This study confirms that simple changes in poultry processing can efficiently mitigate generation of infectious airborne particles and transmission.

Technical Abstract: Airborne transmission of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses has occurred among poultry and from poultry to humans during home or live-poultry market slaughter of infected poultry, and such transmission has been experimentally reproduced. In this study, we investigated simple, practical changes in the processing of H5N1 virus-infected chickens to reduce infectious airborne particles and their transmission. Our findings suggest that containing the birds during the killing and bleeding first step by using a disposable plastic bag, a commonly available cooking pot widely used in Egypt (halla), or a bucket significantly reduces generation of infectious airborne particles and transmission to ferrets. Similarly, lack of infectious airborne particles was observed when processing vaccinated chickens that had been challenged with HPAI virus. Moreover, the use of a mechanical defeatherer significantly increased total number of particles in the air compared to manual defeathering. This study confirms that simple changes in poultry processing can efficiently mitigate generation of infectious airborne particles and their transmission to humans.