Skip to main content
ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Systematic Entomology Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #351011

Research Project: Systematics of Moths Significant to Biodiversity, Quarantine, and Control, with a Focus on Invasive Species

Location: Systematic Entomology Laboratory

Title: Two new species of a Petrophila Guilding (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) from northcentral Arizona, U.S.A

Author
item Solis, M
item Tuskes, P. - University Of San Diego

Submitted to: Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/6/2018
Publication Date: 8/8/2018
Citation: Solis, M.A., Tuskes, P. 2018. Two new species of a Petrophila Guilding (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) from northcentral Arizona, U.S.A. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington. 120(3):593-604. https://doi.org/pdf/10.4289/0013-8797.120.3.593 .
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4289/0013-8797.120.3.593

Interpretive Summary: Moths with aquatic caterpillars have been tested for the biological control of invasive aquatic weeds; damage caused by aquatic invasive weeds is estimated to cost $150-200 million annually. These caterpillars are intercepted at U.S. ports with plants for the tropical aquarium fish industry. We describe two new species of aquatic caterpillars from north central Arizona. The male and female adult moths and genitalia are illustrated. A table comparing the genitalic differences between the two new species and three other similar species is provided. This information will be useful to students, ecologists, biological control workers of aquatic weeds, and quarantine personnel at U.S. ports.

Technical Abstract: Two new species of aquatic crambids, Petrophila anna, sp. n. and Petrophila cornvillia, sp. n., are described from north central Arizona. They were initially found in Oak Creek which traverses both Coconino and Yavapai counties, but they can be observed most frequently at and below Red Rock Crossing as the creek flows southwest to the Verde River. The male and female adult moths and genitalia are illustrated. A table comparing the genitalic differences between the two new species and three other similar species in Petrophila is provided.