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Research Project: Biological Control of Invasive Arthropod Pests from the Eastern Hemisphere

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Title: Biological control of olive fruit fly in California - release, establishment and impact of Psyttalia lounsburyi and Psyttalia humilis

Author
item DAANE, KENT - University Of California
item WANG, XINGENG - University Of California
item PICKETT, CHARLIE - California Department Of Food And Agriculture
item BLANCHET, ARNAUD - European Biological Control Laboratory (EBCL)
item NIETO, DIEGO - Driscoll'S
item Hoelmer, Kim
item BON, MARIE-CLAUDE - European Biological Control Laboratory (EBCL)
item Smith, Lincoln - Link

Submitted to: International Symposium on Biological Control of Arthropods
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/11/2017
Publication Date: 9/18/2017
Citation: Daane, K., Wang, X., Pickett, C., Blanchet, A., Nieto, D., Hoelmer, K.A., Bon, M., Smith, L. 2017. Biological control of olive fruit fly in California - release, establishment and impact of Psyttalia lounsburyi and Psyttalia humilis. 5th International Symposium on Biological Control of Arthropods, Langkawi Island, Malaysia, Sept. 10-15, 2017. pp. 156-158.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Geographic strains of the African endoparasitoids Psyttalia lounsburyi and Psyttalia humilis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) were released to suppress the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae, in California from 2006 – 2016. Both parasitoid species were recovered post-release within the same fruit season; however, only P. lounsburyi was recovered post-release in the following fruit seasons. P. lounsburyi was recovered at numerous sites, >2 years after a release, and >50 km from a release location. P. lounsburyi is now established in California coastal regions, but not inland, and is found in ornamental trees but has not yet been found in insecticide-treated commercial orchards. We discuss aspects of parasitoid biology that could impede parasitoid establishment and control levels.