Skip to main content
ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Kimberly, Idaho » Northwest Irrigation and Soils Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #349603

Research Project: Improving Management Practices for Irrigated Western Cropping and Dairy Systems to Contribute to Sustainability and Improve Air Quality

Location: Northwest Irrigation and Soils Research

Title: Is static nitrogen management in northwestern U.S. sugarbeet production appropriate?

Author
item Tarkalson, David
item Bjorneberg, David - Dave
item Dean, Greg - Amalgamated Sugar Company

Submitted to: Agricultural and Environmental Letters
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/16/2018
Publication Date: 10/18/2018
Citation: Tarkalson, D.D., Bjorneberg, D.L., Dean, G. 2018. Is static nitrogen management in northwestern U.S. sugarbeet production appropriate?. Agricultural and Environmental Letters. 3:180001. https://doi.org/10.2134/ael2018.01.0001.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.2134/ael2018.01.0001

Interpretive Summary: Nitrogen management is important in sugarbeet production. Evaluation of historic data suggest that static N management (fixed N supply independent of yields) may have advantages compared to yield goal based N management in the Northwest U.S. Proposed static N recommendations aim to supply spring total available N supply (soil available N + fertilizer N) of less than 202 kg N/ha (180 lbs N/a) for heavier texture soils and less than 224 kg N/ha (200 lbs N/a) for course textured or shallow soils. These static supply recommendations represent maximum N supplies.

Technical Abstract: Nitrogen (N) management is important in sugarbeet production. Evaluation of historic data suggest that static N management (fixed N supply independent of yields) may have advantages compared to yield goal based N management in the Northwest U.S. From early 1970’s to 2011, the amount of N supply to maximize yields in research studies was within a narrow N supply range of 179 to 204 kg N/ha. Recommended N supplies have not increased as yields increased. Proposed static N recommendations aim to supply spring total available N supply (soil NO3-N and NH4-N to a depth of 0.9 m [3 ft] + fertilizer N) of less than 202 kg N/ha (180 lbs N/a) for heavier texture soils (sandy loams to clays) and less than 224 kg N/ha (200 lbs N/a) for course texture (loamy sands to sands) or shallow soils. These static supply recommendations represent maximum N supplies.