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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #349191

Research Project: Cardiovascular Nutrition and Health

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: Dietary fats and cardiovascular disease: a presidential advisory from the American Heart Association

Author
item Sacks, Frank - Harvard University
item Lichtenstein, Alice - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Wu, Jason - The George Institute For Global Health
item Appel, Lawrence - Johns Hopkins University
item Creager, Mark - Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center
item Kris-etherton, Penny - Pennsylvania State University
item Miller, Michael - University Of Maryland
item Rimm, Eric - Harvard University
item Robinson, Jennifer - University Of Iowa
item Stone, Neal - Northwestern University
item Van Horn, Linda - Northwestern University

Submitted to: Circulation
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/1/2017
Publication Date: 6/15/2017
Citation: Sacks, F.M., Lichtenstein, A.H., Wu, J., Appel, L.J., Creager, M.A., Kris-Etherton, P., Miller, M., Rimm, E., Robinson, J.G., Stone, N., Van Horn, L. 2017. Dietary fats and cardiovascular disease: a presidential advisory from the American Heart Association. Circulation. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000510.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading global cause of death, accounting for 17.3 million deaths per year. Preventive treatment that reduces CVD by even a small percentage can substantially reduce, nationally and globally, the number of people who develop CVD and the costs of caring for them. This American Heart Association presidential advisory on dietary fats and CVD reviews and discusses the scientific evidence, including the most recent studies, on the effects of dietary saturated fat intake and its replacement by other types of fats and carbohydrates on CVD. Intervention studies indicate that lowering dietary saturated fat intake and replacing it with polyunsaturated vegetable oil reduced CVD by about one-third. Observational studies indicate that lower saturated fat intake coupled with higher polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat intake is associated with lower rates of CVD. In contrast, replacement of saturated fat with refined carbohydrates and sugars is not associated with these favorable effects on CVD. Replacement of saturated with unsaturated fats lowers low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, a cause of atherosclerosis, linking biological evidence with incidence of CVD in populations and in clinical trials. Taking into consideration the totality of the scientific evidence, satisfying rigorous criteria for causality, it is concluded that lowering saturated fat intake and replacing it with unsaturated fats, especially polyunsaturated fats, will lower the incidence of CVD. This recommended shift from saturated to unsaturated fats should occur simultaneously in an overall healthful dietary pattern such as that recommended by the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.