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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #348933

Research Project: Nutrients, Aging, and Musculoskeletal Function

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: Nutritional concerns in osteoporosis

Author
item Dawson-hughes, Bess - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University

Submitted to: Handbook of Clinical Nutrition and Aging: 3rd Edition
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/15/2014
Publication Date: 1/1/2015
Citation: Dawson-Hughes, B. 2015. Nutritional concerns in osteoporosis. In: Bales, C.W., Locher, J.L., Saltzman, E., Editors. Handbook of Clinical Nutrition and Aging: 3rd Edition. New York, NY: Springer Science. p. 273-285. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1929-1_17.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Key Points: - Adequate calcium intake, 1,000-1,200 mg per day, supports the preservation of bone mass in older adults. - Higher calcium intake should be avoided because it adds no value and may increase the risk of kidney stones and higher cardiovascular disease, although the evidence is inconsistent. - Vitamin D lowers fracture risk by improving bone mass and lowering risk of falling. An intake of 800-1,000 IU per day is sufficient for most older adults. - The magnitude of the risk reduction for falls and fractures with vitamin D supplementation is approximately 20%. - High, infrequent dosing with vitamin D should be avoided because it increases risk of falls and fractures. - Lowering the acid load of the diet with alkaline salts of potassium has been shown to lower rates of bone resorption and, in some trials, to lower rates of bone loss, but the effect on fracture risk is unknown. There is some evidence that these salts improve muscle performance over the short term; long term studies are needed to determine whether these favorable results persist.