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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Poplarville, Mississippi » Southern Horticultural Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #348909

Research Project: Production and Disease and Pest Management of Horticultural Crops

Location: Southern Horticultural Research

Title: Meta-analysis of chlorine usage as a disinfestant in plant production

Author
item Copes, Warren

Submitted to: International Congress of Plant Pathology Abstracts and Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/1/2018
Publication Date: 10/1/2018
Citation: Copes, W.E. 2018. Meta-analysis of chlorine usage as a disinfestant in plant production. International Congress of Plant Pathology Abstracts and Proceedings. 10:S1.163.

Interpretive Summary: Chlorine has a long history of usage as a disinfestant to kill plant pathogens on tools, equipment, production surfaces and harvested produce surfaces in plant production systems. The main active ingredient of many commercial chlorine sanitizers is sodium hypochlorite, which has been used at rates from 1 to 20% product and exposure times as short as 10 sec to as long as 60 min. Many studies have shown chlorine disinfestants to be highly effective, while others have shown moderate to poor activity against some plant pathogens and when treating some production surfaces. The current study compares the effectiveness of chlorine dose and exposure time from published studies evaluating control of bacteria, fungi, viroids or viruses that infect various agricultural and horticultural crops. Conclusions will be presented describing strengths and weaknesses of disinfestants to kill plant pathogens.

Technical Abstract: Chlorine has a long history of usage as a disinfestant to inactivate plant pathogens on tools, equipment, production surfaces and harvested produce surfaces in plant production systems. The main active ingredient of many commercial chlorine sanitizers is sodium hypochlorite, which has been used at rates from 1 to 20% product and exposure times as short as 10 sec to as long as 60 min. Many studies have shown chlorine disinfestants to be highly effective, while others have shown moderate to poor activity against some plant pathogens and when treating some production surfaces. The current study looks at summary means and variances of chlorine dose and treatment duration used to inactivate bacteria, fungi, viroids and viruses in multiple production stages and applications. A meta-analysis was performed on data from manuscripts presenting plant disease control in production of many agricultural and horticultural plant hosts. Conclusions will be presented describing categorical groupings where differing rates were needed to achieve inactivation of plant pathogens.