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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Urbana, Illinois » Global Change and Photosynthesis Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #348772

Research Project: Identifying and Manipulating Key Determinants of Photosynthetic Production and Partitioning

Location: Global Change and Photosynthesis Research

Title: Phloem function: A key to understanding and manipulating plant responses to rising atmospheric [CO2]?

Author
item Ainsworth, Elizabeth - Lisa
item Lemonnier, Pauline - Oak Ridge Institute For Science And Education (ORISE)

Submitted to: Current Opinion in Plant Biology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/10/2017
Publication Date: 1/9/2018
Citation: Ainsworth, E.A., Lemonnier, P. 2018. Phloem function: A key to understanding and manipulating plant responses to rising atmospheric [CO2]? Current Opinion in Plant Biology. 43:50-56.

Interpretive Summary: Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) directly stimulates photosynthesis and reduces stomatal conductance in C3 plants. Both of these physiological effects could alter the function of sucrose loading in the phloem at elevated [CO2]. Recent research has clearly established that photosynthetic capacity is correlated to vascular traits associated with phloem loading and water transport, but the effects of elevated [CO2] on these relationships have not been broadly unexplored. Plants use different mechanisms for loading sucrose and other sugars into the phloem, and it is unknown if species with different phloem loading strategies respond differently to elevated [CO2]. This paper summarizes recent research manipulating sucrose transporters and other key enzymes with roles in phloem loading show promise for maximizing crop performance in an elevated [CO2] world.

Technical Abstract: Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) directly stimulates photosynthesis and reduces stomatal conductance in C3 plants. Both of these physiological effects have the potential to alter phloem function at elevated [CO2]. Recent research has clearly established that photosynthetic capacity is correlated to vascular traits associated with phloem loading and water transport, but the effects of elevated [CO2] on these relationships are largely unexplored. Plants also employ different strategies for loading sucrose and other sugars into the phloem, and there is potential for species with different phloem loading strategies to respond differently to elevated [CO2]. Recent research manipulating sucrose transporters and other key enzymes with roles in phloem loading show promise for maximizing crop performance in an elevated [CO2] world.