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Research Project: Nutrients, Aging, and Musculoskeletal Function

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: Vitamin K: dietary intake and requirements in different clinical conditions

Author
item Harshman, Stephanie - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Saltzman, Edward - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Booth, Sarah - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University

Submitted to: Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/15/2014
Publication Date: 11/1/2014
Citation: Harshman, S.G., Saltzman, E., Booth, S.L. 2014. Vitamin K: dietary intake and requirements in different clinical conditions. Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care. 17:531-538. https://doi.org/10.1097/MCO.0000000000000112.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Purpose of review: Vitamin K is an enzyme cofactor for the carboxylation of vitamin K dependent proteins (VKDP). Functions include coagulation and regulation of calcification. Different clinical conditions may alter vitamin K requirements by affecting vitamin K status and VKDP carboxylation, which are reviewed here. Recent findings: Vitamin K consumption greater than the current usual daily consumption to maintain health is indicated for prevention of vitamin K deficient bleeding (VKDB) in infants and for rescue of over-anticoagulation in patients on vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants (VKA). Additional vitamin K intake may be required in malabsorptive conditions such as cystic fibrosis and following bariatric surgery. Carboxylation of VKDP occurs in multiple extrahepatic tissues and has been implicated in soft tissue calcification and insulin resistance (IR), although the exact mechanisms have yet to be determined. Contribution of colonic flora to vitamin K requirements remains controversial. Summary: With the increased incidence of VKDB and weight-loss surgical procedures, healthcare professionals need to monitor vitamin K status in certain patient populations. Future research on the roles of vitamin K in extrahepatic tissues as they pertain to chronic disease will provide insight into the therapeutic potential of vitamin K and lead to the development of recommendations for specific clinical populations.