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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #348508

Research Project: Plant Components and Aging

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: Avenanthramide-enriched oats have an anti-inflammatory action: a pilot clinical trial

Author
item Mckay, Diane - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Chen, Chung-yen - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Collins, William - Agriculture And Agri-Food Canada
item Blumberg, Jeffrey - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/18/2015
Publication Date: 4/1/2015
Citation: McKay, D.L., Chen, C., Collins, W., Blumberg, J.B. 2015. Avenanthramide-enriched oats have an anti-inflammatory action: a pilot clinical trial. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 29(1):922.18.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Regular consumption of oats has been shown to benefit heart health by lowering serum lipids in humans, an effect mediated primarily via beta-glucan. Other components of oats, including the polyphenolic avenanthramides (AV), may also contribute to reducing the risk of atherogenesis. In vivo, oat AV enhance antioxidant activity, and in vitro, these compounds attenuate the expression and/or secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. The anti-inflammatory properties of oat AV in a whole food form (oat flour) have only recently been demonstrated in humans. To determine whether the AV-enriched bran from "false malted" oat kernels (US Patent Application 20120082740) reduces biomarkers of inflammation, we conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind pilot study in 16 healthy men and postmenopausal women age >/=45 y and BMI of 28-38 kg/m2 with central adiposity. Subjects consumed daily either a smoothie made with AV-enriched oat bran (containing 90 mg AV) or a macronutrient and fiber-matched placebo absent oats for 8 wk. Fasting blood samples were collected at baseline, 4, and 8 wk. Among subjects with CRP levels >/=3.0 mg/L, the oat smoothie lowered VCAM-1 concentrations at 4 wk (P=0.031) and 8 wk (P>0.05) by 13 and 10%, respectively, compared to placebo. Non-significant reductions at 4 and 8 wk of 18 and 43%, respectively, were observed for serum amyloid A-1, an acute phase reactant in inflammation. These pilot data suggest that consuming AV in whole food form, i.e., AV-enriched oat bran, may affect specific biomarkers of inflammation in older, overweight or obese adults.