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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #348507

Research Project: Plant Components and Aging

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: Whole eggs enhance antioxidant activity when combined with energy dense, cooked breakfast foods

Author
item Mckay, Diane - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Chen, Chung-yen - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Rasmussen, Helen - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Blumberg, Jeffrey - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/18/2015
Publication Date: 4/1/2015
Citation: McKay, D.L., Chen, C., Rasmussen, H., Blumberg, J.B. 2015. Whole eggs enhance antioxidant activity when combined with energy dense, cooked breakfast foods. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 29(1):924.22.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Acute metabolic changes following the consumption of energy dense foods high in saturated fat (SFA) and glycemic load (GL) may contribute to the pathogenesis of several chronic diseases. Eggs provide highly digestible protein, unsaturated fatty acids, carotenoids, and other antioxidant compounds that may act synergistically to antagonize these unfavorable effects when combined with traditional American cooked breakfast foods high in SFA, GL, and low in nutrient density. To determine the postprandial effects of a breakfast containing pork sausages and hash brown potatoes with no eggs (N), 2 eggs (E), or a low-antioxidant protein + cholesterol egg substitute (ES) on biomarkers of antioxidant activity, oxidative stress, and endothelial function, we conducted a crossover pilot study in 20 subjects (50-70 y, BMI 28-34) with a 2-d low antioxidant diet run-in and 1 wk washout for each intervention. Samples were collected before and for 4 h after each isocaloric breakfast. E increased the AUC (% baseline) for total thiols by 4.2% compared with ES (P=0.018) and by 1.1% compared with N (P>0.05). Non-significant increases in AUC for plasma ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and resistance of LDL to Cu(2+)-induced oxidation were also observed with E vs. ES, as well as E vs. N. Compared with baseline, NOx increased 15% at 1 h with E (P=0.043) and 10% with N (P=0.059). The data from this pilot study suggest these positive postprandial effects of eggs on antioxidant activity may be attributed to the whole food.