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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #348506

Research Project: Genomics, Nutrition, and Health

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: Network-based characterization of inflammation biomarkers, phytochemicals and disease

Author
item KAMANU, FREDERICK - JEAN MAYER HUMAN NUTRITION RESEARCH CENTER ON AGING AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY
item ZIRKLER, ESTELLE - JEAN MAYER HUMAN NUTRITION RESEARCH CENTER ON AGING AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY
item OBIN, MARTIN - JEAN MAYER HUMAN NUTRITION RESEARCH CENTER ON AGING AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY
item ORDOVAS, JOSE - JEAN MAYER HUMAN NUTRITION RESEARCH CENTER ON AGING AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY
item Parnell, Laurence
item SMITH, CAREN - JEAN MAYER HUMAN NUTRITION RESEARCH CENTER ON AGING AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/28/2015
Publication Date: 4/1/2015
Citation: Kamanu, F., Zirkler, E., Obin, M.S., Ordovas, J.M., Parnell, L.D., Smith, C.E. 2015. Network-based characterization of inflammation biomarkers, phytochemicals and disease. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 29(1):923.18.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Chronic inflammation is often a major contributor to the onset and progression of cardiometabolic dysfunction. Whether through effects on the inflammatory response system or independent of inflammation, plant-derived polyphenols comprise a micro-nutrient class important in cardiovascular disease and other cardiometabolic traits. Well-known effects of these compounds include reducing blood glucose, acting as a diuretic, and raising HDL cholesterol. Using a computational approach, published phytochemicals and disease interaction information was mined from the literature and integrated with publicly available phytochemical data, including those relating specific phytochemicals to food items. The resulting federated database can be interrogated for the purpose of constructing molecular networks that depict relationships between diet, cardiometabolic traits, aging, and inflammation. This nutrition-inflammation interactome is a useful tool to understanding the diet-disease-inflammation axis and is also a vehicle for generating testable hypotheses in the laboratory setting.