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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #347776

Research Project: Production and Processing Intervention Strategies for Poultry Associated Foodborne Pathogens

Location: Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research

Title: Use of 2-nitro-1-propanol as an intervention strategy in laying hens

Author
item KOYUN, OSMAN - University Of Georgia
item Cosby, Douglas
item Cox, Nelson - Nac
item KIM, WOO - University Of Georgia

Submitted to: International Poultry Scientific Forum
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/27/2017
Publication Date: 1/29/2018
Citation: Koyun, O.Y., Cosby, D.E., Cox Jr, N.A., Kim, W.K. 2018. Use of 2-nitro-1-propanol as an intervention strategy in laying hens [abstract]. International Poultry Scientific Forum. 97(E-Suppl.1):292.

Interpretive Summary: none

Technical Abstract: The presence of Salmonella in laying hens continues to be a problem in the industry. A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of 2-nitro-1-propanol (NP) on recovery of Salmonella internal organs of laying hens. Thirty-four White Leghorns were orally challenged with a nalidixic acid resistant Salmonella Enteritidis (SENR). Hens were housed individually in wire cages and randomly allocated to one of seven dietary treatments: T1 = SENR unchallenged (negative control), T2 = SENR challenged with low dose (106 cfu/ml), T3 = SENR challenged with low dose (106 cfu/ml) + 100 ppm NP, T4 = SENR challenged with low dose (106 cfu/ml) + 200 ppm NP, T5 = SENR challenged with high dose (108 cfu/ml), T6 = SENR challenged with high dose (108 cfu/ml) + 100 ppm NP, and T7 = SENR challenged with high dose (108 cfu/ml) + 200 ppm NP. Fecal samples were collected at 3 and 6 days post inoculation (dpi) and assayed for recovery of SENR. At 3 and 6 dpi, T4 had the least positivity (40%) in terms shedding, whereas T5 and T6 diets did not show any considerable effect on hens to reduce the presence of SENR in the feces. Hens were sampled at 7 dpi. Ceca, liver with gall bladder (L/GB), spleen and ovary samples were collected for recovery of SENR. Treatment 4 (SENR challenged with low dose (106 cfu/ml) + 200 ppm NP) significantly decreased (p<0.05) cecal SENR count, but there was no substantial reduction in T5, T6 and T7. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and when significant, means were compared with Duncan’s test (p<0.05). In addition, there was no significant difference in SENR reduction in the L/GB, spleen and ovary samples. In L/GB, 40% of the hens were positive in T2 and T7, while 20% were positive in T6. No SENR was recovered from hens in T3, T4 and T5. When the spleens were sampled, 40% were positive in T4, T5 and T7, however, T3 (SENR challenged with low dose (106 cfu/ml) + 100 ppm NP) showed only 20% positive. In the ovaries, no recovery of SENR was detected in T4 and T6, however 20% were positive in T2, T3, T5 and T7. In conclusion, inclusion of NP into laying hen diets can serve as an effective intervention strategy to reduce Salmonella infection in hens.