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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #347686

Research Project: IPM Methods for Insect Pests of Orchard Crops

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Host plant resistance associated with Poncirus trifoliata influence oviposition, development and adult emergence of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae)

Author
item George, Justin
item Lapointe, Stephen

Submitted to: Pest Management Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/3/2018
Publication Date: 6/9/2018
Citation: George, J., Lapointe, S.L. 2018. Host plant resistance associated with Poncirus trifoliata influence oviposition, development and adult emergence of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) . Pest Management Science. https://doi.org/10.1002ps.5113.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002ps.5113

Interpretive Summary: The Asian citrus psyllid is the primary vector of the bacterium presumed to be responsible for citrus greening disease, a devastating citrus disease. Infestations of the psyllid frequently occur on Citrus and related tree species. Poncirus trifoliata is a member of the same family as Citrus and readily hybridizes with Citrus. The development of immature stages (nymphs) of the psyllid was delayed and fewer adults emerged in no-choice tests on a resistant clone of Poncirus trifoliata compared with nymphs placed on the susceptible Citrus macrophylla. In choice assays, psyllids exhibited a preference for Citrus compared with accessions of Poncirus trifoliata, especially ‘Kryder 55-5’. This indicates that psyllids can choose a host plant based on host nutritional quality and shows a non-preference in their feeding, oviposition, nymphal development and adult emergence towards accessions (clones) of Poncirus trifoliata. Reduced oviposition, developmental delays associated with trifoliate accessions and reduced adult emergence indicate that Poncirus trifoliata exhibits a combination of plant resistance traits that may be valuable in a traditional plant breeding program.

Technical Abstract: The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, is the primary vector of the phloem-inhabiting bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus putatively responsible for citrus greening (huanglongbing), a devastating citrus disease. Infestations of Diaphorina citri frequently develop on Citrus and other genera within the Rutaceae subfamily Aurantioideae including Murraya and Bergera. Poncirus trifoliata is also a member of the Aurantioideae and readily hybridizes with Citrus spp. The development of Diaphorina citri nymphs was delayed and fewer adults emerged in no-choice tests on Poncirus trifoliata ‘Kryder 55-5’ compared with nymphs placed on the susceptible Citrus macrophylla. In choice assays, psyllids exhibited non-preference or antixenotic behavior towards accessions of Poncirus trifoliata, especially ‘Kryder 55-5’ compared with Citrus macrophylla. This indicates that psyllids can choose a host plant based on host nutritional quality and volatiles, and shows a non-preference in their feeding, oviposition, nymphal development and adult emergence towards Poncirus trifoliata accessions. Also, reduced oviposition, the developmental delays associated with trifoliate accessions and the reduced adult emergence in the choice assays indicate that Poncirus trifoliata exhibits a combination of antixenotic and antibiotic host plant resistance. Our companion plant assay showed that the presence of preferred host plant volatiles can influence the oviposition behavior on a non-preferred host plant. Here we show that the antixenosis associated with trifoliate accessions can be overcome by the presence of a preferred susceptible host plant; but the antibiosis effects make it a non-preferred host plant.