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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Soybean Genomics & Improvement Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #347662

Research Project: Microscopy Applications for the Identification and Management of Agricultural Pests and Pathogens

Location: Soybean Genomics & Improvement Laboratory

Title: Combating rose rosette disease US national project

Author
item Byrne, D - Texas A&m University
item Klein, P - Texas A&m University
item Hall, C - Texas A&m University
item Windham, M - University Of Tennessee
item Ochoa-corona, F - Oklahoma State University
item Olson, J - Oklahoma State University
item Paret, M - North Florida Research & Education Center
item Babu, M - North Florida Research & Education Center
item Knox, G - North Florida Research & Education Center
item Jordan, Ramon
item Hammond, John
item Ong, K - Texas State University
item Ochoa, Ronald - Ron
item Bauchan, Gary
item Evans, T - University Of Delaware
item Windham, A - University Of Tennessee
item Hale, F - University Of Tennessee
item Palma, M - Texas A&m University
item Ribera, L - Texas A&m University
item Pemberton, H - Texas A&m University

Submitted to: Acta Horticulturae
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/7/2018
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Rose Rosette Disease (RRD) has spread from its source in western North America through the Mid-West to the East coast in the past few decades. It now threatens to decimate the US rose industry valued at $400 million. RRD is caused by the Rose rosette virus (RRV), which is transmitted by wind-blown mites (Phyllocoptes fructiphilus). Unlike other rose diseases, it can kill a rose within two to three years of infection. University and USDA-ARS scientists from 6 states, private rose breeders, and members of the American Rose Society, AmericanHort, and the rose industry initiated a project to develop a multidisciplinary approach including Best Management Practices and educational materials on host, virus, and vector biology to minimize the effects of RRD and to control the disease. Genes associated with RRD resistance are being identified and efforts are being coordinated to move RRD resistance into elite roses. Economic and marketing studies are being done to assess the economic effect of RRD on the rose industry, to understand consumer preferences, and to identify barriers to rose sales. The results from this collaborative project are expected to help rose producers, breeders, growers, plant protection officers, entomologists, plant pathologists, and agriculture scientists in the government, at universities, and at private universities who are interested in solving rose rosette disease problems.

Technical Abstract: In the past few decades, Rose Rosette Disease (RRD) has spread from its source in western North America through the Mid-West to the East coast. It now threatens to decimate the US rose industry. Garden roses, which form the cornerstone of the multi-billion dollar landscape industry, annually generate wholesale US domestic bare root and container production valued at ~ $400 million. RRD is caused by an emaravirus, Rose rosette virus (RRV), which is transmitted by wind-blown eriophyid mites (Phyllocoptes fructiphilus). Unlike other rose diseases, it can kill a rose within two to three years of infection. In collaboration with University and USDA-ARS scientists from 6 states, private rose breeders, the American Rose Society, AmericanHort, and the rose industry, a project was initiated to develop a multidisciplinary approach to control the disease. In the short term, the project is working to develop Best Management Practices and educational materials based on host, virus, and vector biology to minimize the effects of RRD. Key to this effort is the development of efficient user-friendly diagnostic tools. In the long term, roses are being assessed for resistance to RRD using both replicated field trials and observational data from collaborators. Marker-trait associations for RRD resistance and consistent flower productivity are being identified to move RRD resistance efficiently into elite rose germplasm. Economic and marketing studies are being done to assess the economic effect of RRD on the rose industry, improve our understanding of consumer preferences, and identify barriers to rose sales.