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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Houma, Louisiana » Sugarcane Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #347608

Research Project: Integrated Weed and Insect Pest Management Systems for Sustainable Sugarcane Production

Location: Sugarcane Research

Title: Solanum nigrescens: A potentially problematic nightshade weed species in Louisiana sugarcane

Author
item Orgeron, Albert - Louisiana State University Agcenter
item Schilling, Edward - University Of Tennessee
item Urbatsch, Lowell - Louisiana State University Agcenter
item Ma, Qisheng - University Of Tennessee
item Spaunhorst, Douglas

Submitted to: American Society of Sugar Cane Technologists
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/13/2018
Publication Date: 6/8/2018
Citation: Orgeron, A.J., Schilling, E.E., Urbatsch, L.E., Ma, Q., Spaunhorst, D.J. 2018. Solanum nigrescens: A potentially problematic nightshade weed species in Louisiana sugarcane. Journal American Society of Sugar Cane Technologists. 38:23-43.

Interpretive Summary: In 2016, sugarcane was grown on 431,600 acres in 24 Louisiana parishes and generated a direct economic value that exceeded 2 billion dollars. A large perennial broadleaf weed appearing to be a member of the Solanum genus was observed in a commercial sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) field in Vacherie, LA in 2010. Since then, this weed has been identified in sugarcane fields in 17 of the 24 parishes which produce sugarcane. The weed has been identified as Solanum nigrescens Mart. & Gal., also known as divine nightshade. Divine nightshade is an introduced species to the United States; however, it has not become a problematic weed in agricultural systems until recently. Its rapid spread to non-infested areas, ability to compete with sugarcane, and tolerance to traditional PRE and POST herbicide programs in Louisiana sugarcane production shows the potential weediness of this nightshade species.

Technical Abstract: A large perennial broadleaf weed appearing to be a member of the Solanum genus was observed in a commercial sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) field in Vacherie, LA in 2010. Since then, this weed has spread to sugarcane fields in 17 of the 24 parishes which produce sugarcane. The weed has been identified as Solanum nigrescens Mart. & Gal., also known as divine nightshade, using phylogenetic analysis. Divine nightshade is an introduced species to the United States. However, it has not become a problematic weed in agricultural systems until recently. Its rapid spread to non-infested areas, ability to compete with sugarcane, and tolerance to traditional PRE and POST herbicide programs in Louisiana sugarcane production shows the potential weediness of this nightshade species.