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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Parlier, California » San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center » Crop Diseases, Pests and Genetics Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #347389

Research Project: Identification of Novel Management Strategies for Key Pests and Pathogens of Grapevine with Emphasis on the Xylella Fastidiosa Pathosystem

Location: Crop Diseases, Pests and Genetics Research

Title: Playback of natural vibrational signals in vineyard trellis for mating disruption of glassy-winged sharpshooter

Author
item Krugner, Rodrigo
item Gordon, Shira
item Niere, Rachele - University Of Trento, Italy
item Mazzoni, Valerio - Fondazione Edmund Mach

Submitted to: CDFA Pierce's Disease Control Program Research Symposium
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/27/2017
Publication Date: 12/12/2017
Citation: Krugner, R., Gordon, S.D., Niere, R., Mazzoni, V. 2017. Playback of natural vibrational signals in vineyard trellis for mating disruption of glassy-winged sharpshooter. CDFA Pierce's Disease Control Program Research Symposium. p. 172.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), is a vector of Xylella fastidiosa, an important bacterial pathogen of several crops in the Americas and Europe. Mating communication of this and many other cicadellid pests involves the exchange of substrate-borne vibrational signals. Exploitation of vibrational signals to interfere with H. vitripennis communication and suppress populations could prove to be a useful tool, but knowledge of the mating behavior was insufficient to initiate development of control methods. In this study, different H. vitripennis communication signals were identified and described, candidate disruptive signals (natural and synthetic) were designed and tested in the laboratory via playback to individuals and male-female pairs, and efficacy of candidate signals in disrupting H. vitripennis mating were validated under field conditions via playback of signals through wires used in vineyard trellis. Data support application of vibrational mating disruption as a novel method to control H. vitripennis populations.