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Research Project: Plant and Microbial Genetic Resource Preservation and Quality Assessment

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Title: National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation

Author
item Miller, Annette
item Greene, Stephanie

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/15/2017
Publication Date: 10/14/2018
Citation: Miller, A.L., Greene, S.L. 2018. National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation. Meeting Abstract. N/A.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Fort Collins is home to globally important living collections of plant and animal genetic resources that comprise the backbone of three critical Federal programs: the National Plant Germplasm System, the National Animal Germplasm Program and the National Culture Collections Network. The National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation (NLGRP) has been located on the CSU campus since 1958 and provides long term backup storage for important living biological collections. Taken together, NLGRP houses the single largest and most diverse collection of agriculturally-relevant germplasm in the world. Plant genetic resources are stored as seed, buds, spores, and pollen, while animal resources are stored as semen, eggs, oocytes and other tissue. Our microbial collection contains bacteria, yeast, fungi and viruses. This wealth of diversity represents a reservoir that can be drawn on to develop crops and livestock that can withstand a multitude of challenges. Secured ex situ, these collections are an insurance policy, protecting biodiversity from genetic erosion and extinction. Importantly, these resources are available to support restoration and reintroduction efforts. Our four story state-of the art vault provides storage at -18° C, -80° C, and -196° C. NLGRP is more than a vault; active research and conservation efforts ensure that we are securing a broad range of living materials, making them freely available to breeders and researchers for generations to come.