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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » Forage Seed and Cereal Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #346404

Research Project: Improvement of Biotic and Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Cool Season Grasses

Location: Forage Seed and Cereal Research

Title: Genome-wide (ChIP-seq) identification of target genes regulated by BdBZIP10 during paraquat-induced oxidative stress

Author
item Martin, Ruth
item Vining, Kelly - Oregon State University
item Dombrowski, James - Jim

Submitted to: Biomed Central (BMC) Plant Biology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/29/2018
Publication Date: 4/10/2018
Citation: Martin, R.C., Vining, K., Dombrowski, J.E. 2018. Genome-wide (ChIP-seq) identification of target genes regulated by BdBZIP10 during paraquat-induced oxidative stress. Biomed Central (BMC) Plant Biology. 18(1):58.

Interpretive Summary: Strategies to increase the resistance of crops to environmental stress will become increasingly important for global food security with our increasing population and more extreme weather patterns. Many stresses experienced by plants have an oxidative stress component associated with them, so characterizing the genetic and biochemical pathways that increase oxidative stress tolerance will be useful for improving the tolerance of crops to multiple environmental stresses. Previously, we identified a regulatory protein (Brachypodium bZIP10) that, when over-expressed in a model grass species, increased its resistance to paraquat-induced oxidative stress. In order to gain a better understanding of this increased oxidative stress tolerance, we identified potential downstream gene targets and DNA binding sites for this protein. The most highly enriched class of proteins that were identified are involved in regulating zinc levels within the plant. Zinc is known to be a very important micronutrient in both animal and plants, and zinc deficiency or zinc excess can lead to oxidative stress. This paper provides a better understanding of the role of the bZIP10 protein in regulating zinc levels during oxidative stress.

Technical Abstract: Transcription factors (TFs) are integral for the control of gene expression during the normal growth and development of all organisms and for facilitating responses to environmental and physiological stresses. Many biotic and abiotic stresses have an oxidative stress component, therefore characterizing the genetic and biochemical pathways that increase oxidative stress tolerance will be useful for improving the tolerance of crops to multiple environmental stresses. Previously, overexpression of the Brachypodium bZIP10 transcription factor was shown to increase oxidative stress tolerance in a model grass. In this study, we used Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) Sequencing to identify potential targets of the Brachypodium bZIP10 transcription factor during oxidative stress. We identified a DNA binding motif, TGDCGACA, different from most known bZIP TF motifs, but with strong homology to the Arabidopsis zinc deficiency response element. Analysis of the ChIP sequences revealed an enrichment of gene ontology groups with metal ion transmembrane transporter, transferase, catalytic and binding activities. Our results support the role of the Brachypodium bZIP10 in maintaining zinc homeostasis as it relates to oxidative stress.