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ARS Home » Plains Area » Bushland, Texas » Conservation and Production Research Laboratory » Soil and Water Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #346284

Research Project: Precipitation and Irrigation Management to Optimize Profits from Crop Production

Location: Soil and Water Management Research

Title: Water use, canopy temperature, lint yield, and fiber quality response of six upland cotton cultivars to water stress

Author
item Schwartz, Robert
item Witt, Travis - Texas Tech University
item Ulloa, Mauricio
item Ritchie, Glen - Texas Tech University
item Auld, Dick - Texas Tech University
item Colaizzi, Paul
item Baumhardt, Roland - Louis
item Pelletier, Mathew
item Burke, John

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/4/2016
Publication Date: 5/1/2017
Citation: Schwartz, R.C., Witt, T., Ulloa, M., Ritchie, G., Auld, D., Colaizzi, P.D., Baumhardt, R.L., Pelletier, M.G., Burke, J.J. 2017. Water use, canopy temperature, lint yield, and fiber quality response of six upland cotton cultivars to water stress [abstract]. In: Proceedings of National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference. Beltwide Cotton Conference, January 4-6, 2017, Dallas, Texas.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The declining saturated thickness of the Ogallala Aquifer combined with the unpredictability of precipitation during the growing season in the Southern High Plains has resulted in elevated production risks associated with short-term crop water deficits. Cotton (Gossypium spp.) cultivars that can use water more efficiently and can sustain yield and fiber quality under drought or limited irrigation will be essential for sustainable cotton production in the Texas High Plains. This field study examined the phenotypic response of six upland cotton (G. hirsutum L.) cultivars to a range of imposed water stresses. Weekly measurements of soil water using a neutron moisture gage, continuous monitoring of infrared canopy temperatures, and periodic thermal images of the canopy in conjunction with observed plant and canopy development at four irrigation rates were evaluated for selected cotton cultivars during the 2016 growing season in Bushland, TX. The relationships between soil water use, canopy cover, canopy temperatures, and cotton development will be examined for the six cultivars at each irrigation rate. In addition, plant development, lint yield, and fiber quality responses to water stress will be evaluated.