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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Citrus and Other Subtropical Products Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #346020

Research Project: Integrated Strategies for Managing Pests and Nutrients in Vegetable and Ornamental Production Systems

Location: Citrus and Other Subtropical Products Research

Title: Using cereal rye (catch crop) and dehydrogenase activity as indicators of the residual fertility effects of anaerobic soil disinfestation and other biological soil management practices following field tomato production

Author
item Paudel, Bodh - University Of Florida
item Zhao, Xin - University Of Florida
item Di Gioia, Francesco - University Of Florida
item Ozores-hampton, Monica - University Of Florida
item Hong, Jason
item Rosskopf, Erin

Submitted to: American Society of Agronomy
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/8/2017
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) and other biological soil management practices employing carbon-rich and/or biologically-active ingredients help contribute to overall soil suppressiveness in crop disease management. However, their roles in soil fertility tended to be overshadowed by disease control effects. This study, conducted in Citra, Florida examined residual fertility effects of ASD and other biological soil management methods following 2016 fall field production of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), by growing cereal rye (Secale cereale) as an indicator catch crop in spring 2017. Soil treatments for the tomato production season included ASD with composted poultry litter (CPL) molasses (M), modified ASD with composted yard trimming waste (YTW), an untreated check, (UTC) soil fumigant control (CSF), varying rates of YTW and M. Cereal rye was seeded 29 days after final tomato harvest without additional fertilization. Aboveground biomass was recorded at two time points in the growth cycle. The rye aboveground biomass was significantly higher in ASD compared to UTC, CSF, and YTW applied alone, but it did not differ significantly from all other treatments containing M. The residual effects of biological soil management practices indicated their impact on soil fertility and nutrient cycling beyond the cash crop season. There is potential to use the residual nutrients from ASD to produce a cover crop to be used as a carbon source in the following cycle of ASD application.

Technical Abstract: Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) and other biological soil management practices employing carbon-rich and/or biologically-active ingredients help contribute to overall soil suppressiveness in crop disease management. However, their roles in soil fertility tended to be overshadowed by disease control effects. This study conducted in Citra, Florida examined residual fertility effects of ASD and other biological soil management methods following 2016 fall field production of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), by growing cereal rye (Secale cereale) as an indicator catch crop in spring 2017. Soil treatments for the tomato production season included ASD with composted poultry litter (11 Mg/ha) and molasses (6.9 m3/ha), modified ASD with composted yard trimming waste at 26.9 (YTW1+M) and 13.5 (YTW0.5+M) Mg/ha plus molasses, YTW1 only, Soil Symphony amendments (SSA, 816 kg/ha, a commercial product containing cotton seed meal, chitosan, molasses, and Bacillus spp.),YTW1+SSA, untreated control (UTC), and chemical soil fumigation (Pic-Clor 60 at 224 kg/ha) (CSF). Cereal rye was seeded 29 days after final tomato harvest without additional fertilization. Aboveground biomass was measured at 42 and 70 days after rye seeding (DAS). Dehydrogenase activity was monitored during the tomato season and also at 0, 42, and 70 DAS. Greater dehydrogenase activity was consistently observed in all soil amendment treatments when compared to UTC and CSF at 75 (first harvest) and 95 (final harvest) days after tomato transplanting. The rye aboveground biomass was significantly higher in ASD compared with UTC, CSF, YTW1, and YTW1+SSA but it did not differ significantly from SSA, YTW1+M, and YTW0.5+M at 70 DAS. Dehydrogenase activity was significantly greater in all biological soil treatments when compared to UTC and CSF at 0 and 42 DAS, but no difference was observed at 70 DAS. The residual effects of biological soil management practices indicated their impact on soil fertility and nutrient cycling beyond the cash crop season.