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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Geneva, New York » Grape Genetics Research Unit (GGRU) » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #346008

Research Project: Improving Fruit Quality, Disease Resistance, and Tolerance to Abiotic Stress in Grape

Location: Grape Genetics Research Unit (GGRU)

Title: High-throughput sequencing data clarify evolutionary relationships among North American Vitis species and improve identification in USDA Vitis germplasm collections

Author
item KLEIN, LAURA - St Louis University
item MILLER, ALLISON - St Louis University
item CIOTIR, CLAUDIA - St Louis University
item MIGICOVSKY, ZOE - Dalhousie University
item URIBE-CONVERS, SIMON - University Of Michigan
item Londo, Jason

Submitted to: American Journal of Botany
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/4/2018
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Grapes are one of the most economically important fruit crops worldwide, with the vast majority of production derived from a single, Mediterranean species, Vitis vinifera. Expansion of grapevine production into new regions such as the North and Eastern portions of the United States, as well as changing pressures from changing climate makes growing V. vinifera challenging. As a result, grapevine breeders hybridize V. vinifera with wild grapevine species to incorporate new adaptive traits. Genetic relationships between grapevine species have long been a topic of study but relationships between species remain unclear. This study was performed to addresses these issues by examining the living collections of wild grapevine maintained by the USDA-ARS germplasm repository system using 11,020 genome wide genetic markers. Analysis of the genetic relatedness of these samples confirms that the genus Vitis arose as a single evolutionary process (monophyly) as well as separates species and species groups within the North American clade. In addition to providing this evolutionary framework for wild grapevine species, the results of this study were used to help assign species names to previously unknown vines growing in the germplasm as well as correct misidentified accessions. This work provides the basis for ongoing germplasm enhancement as it creates the genetic framework for identifying novel genetic variation and incorporating new, unsampled populations into the repository system for future breeding efforts.

Technical Abstract: Grapes are one of the most economically important fruit crops worldwide, with the vast majority of production derived from a single, Mediterranean species, Vitis vinifera. Expansion of production into new niches and changing pressures from changing climate necessitates the use of wild grapevine species in breeding programs to introgress adaptive traits. Evolutionary relationships between grapevine species have long been a topic of study but relationships between species remain unresolved. This study addresses these issues by examining the living collections of wild grapevine maintained by the USDA-ARS germplasm repository system using 11,020 genome wide genotyping-by-sequencing derived SNP markers. Phylogenetic analysis confirms the monophyly of the genus Vitis as well as delineates species and species groups within the North American clade. In addition to providing this evolutionary framework for wild grapevine species, the results of this study were used to help assign species designations to previously unknown germplasm samples as well as correct misidentified accessions. This work provides the basis for ongoing germplasm enhancement as it creates the genetic framework for identifying novel genetic variation and incorporating new, unsampled populations into the repository system for future breeding efforts.